Policies

2021-2022 Academic Year - Current

The Office of Student Accountability is dedicated to encouraging responsible community behavior, educating UI students, and facilitating accountability in situations where violations of the Code of Student Life have occurred. When incidents happen, primarily on campus, and UI students are involved, our office is the main university entity that works with students to resolve disciplinary matters. We also ensure that students receive fair treatment in all hearings. Students, faculty and staff who believe there has been a violation can contact the Office of Students Accountability to discuss options available for reporting incidents to the appropriate authorities. Office staff can assist victims of assault or harassment by a University student, and they can also direct you to educational programs on a variety of related topics.

Policies and Regulations Affecting Students

  1. Student Rights

    1. Student Bill of Rights
    2. Policies Related to Student Rights and Responsibilities
    3. Student Records Policy
    4. Student Complaints Concerning Faculty Actions
    5. Student Complaints Concerning Actions By Teaching Assistants
    6. University Policy on Human Rights
    7. Office of the University Ombudsperson
    8. University Policy on Sexual Harassment
    9. University Policy on Consensual Relationships Involving Students
    10. University Policy on Anti-Harassment
    11. Student Employee Grievance Procedure
    12. Complaints of Discrimination
    13. Disability Protection Policy
    14. Anti-Retaliation Policy
    15. Statement of Religious Diversity and the University Calendar
    16. Interim Policy on Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct
      1. Sanctioning Guidelines for Sexual Assault
  2. Student Responsibilities

    1. Code of Student Life (2021-2022 academic year)
    2. Accountability Procedure (2021-2022 academic year)
    3. Academic Misconduct
    4. Policy Regarding Use of Illegal Drugs and Alcohol
      1. Responsible Action Protocol
      2. Minimum Sanctions for Violations of the University Alcohol and Drug Policies
    5. Uniform Rules of Personal Conduct at Universities Under the Jurisdiction of the State Board of Regent
    6. Judicial Procedure for Alleged Violations of the Regents’ Rules of Personal Conduct
    7. Legal Assistance for Students
    8. Use of Campus Outdoor Areas
    9. Campus Policy on Violence
    10. Policy on Acceptable Use of Information Technology Resources
    11. Frequently Asked Questions about Code of Student Life
    12. Flowchart for the Accountability Procedure
  3. Student Organizations

    1. Registration of Student Organizations
    2. Administration of Student Organizations
    3. Discipline of Registered Student Organizations
  4. Miscellaneous

    1. Registration of Student Automobiles
    2. Lost & Found
    3. Reporting Correct Residential Address and E-mail Address
    4. Mandatory Student Fees Policy
    5. Voter Registration
    6. Picture Student Identification
    7. Graduation Rate
    8. Critical Mentoring and Student Support (Critical MASS)
    9. Federal Student Aid Penalties for Illegal Drug Convictions
    10. Annual Reports
    11. Dean Clearance Letters
    12. Preferred First Name Policy
  5. Campus Crime Policies & Statistics

    1. Department of Public Safety
    2. Safety & Respect
  6. Tables

    1. Controlled Substances - Uses & Effects
    2. Federal Tracking Penalties - Marijuana and Penalties for Possession
    3. Penalties under Iowa Law for Manufacturing, Delivering, Possessing with the Intent to Deliver a Controlled Substance, a Counterfeit Substance or a Simulated Controlled Substance
    4. Summary of Penalties for Various Offense Categories

Student Life Campus-wide Policies

  1. University Events Committee Policies, Procedures, & Guidelines
  2. UI Policies for Visiting Political Candidates & Elected Officials 

 


Student Bill of Rights

It is the policy of The University of Iowa that each student shall be guaranteed the following rights and freedoms; enumeration of the rights or registration at the University shall in no manner be construed to nullify or limit any other constitutional or legal rights or freedoms possessed by students as citizens or residents of the United States or the State of Iowa: 

  1. The right to participate freely in University-sponsored services and activities consistent with the University Policy on Human Rights; that is, without discrimination based on any classifications that deprive the person of consideration as an individual.
  2. The right to obtain a clear statement of basic rights, obligations, and responsibilities concerning both academic and nonacademic student conduct.
  3. The right to be evaluated in the classroom solely on the basis of academic achievement and fulfillment of educational requirements with freedom of expression protected and respected.
  4. The right to organize and join associations in order to promote common interests.
  5. The right of protection from the creation and maintenance by the University of records specifically reflecting the student’s beliefs or their political activities and associations, and the right of assurance that only the names of organizational representatives and the organization’s financial status be included as part of the public record of student organizations maintained by the University.
  6. Consistent with federal and state laws, the general right of protection from the release of non-directory information to persons outside the University community of academic, organizational, and disciplinary records without the express consent of the student or a court order.
  7. The right to petition for changes in either academic or nonacademic regulations, procedures, or practices.
  8. The right to be represented by a democratic student government.
  9. The right to have clearly defined means to participate in the formulation and application of institutional policy affecting both academic and nonacademic student affairs. The student’s participation shall include the right to gain access to information, to express views, and to have these views considered.
  10. The right of protection from the placement of non-University financial obligations on the student’s University account without the express consent of the student.
  11. The right to be free from disciplinary action by the University for misconduct except under reasonable rules which have as their substantive basis the protection of some clear and distinct interest of the University as an academic institution.
  12. The right to due process in any action brought or taken by the University against the student which can reasonably be expected to affect the student’s status with the University or any of its constituent parts or agencies.
  13. The right to protection from ex post facto regulations

Policies Related to Student Rights and Responsibilities

As in the broader community, many of the values and standards of behavior desired in an academic community are best transmitted by example, persuasion, and mutual respect. Beyond the unwritten code which governs us, however, is the need for formal, written policies and procedures which will ensure due process to any and all who become involved in a dispute or conflict within the academic community.

These policies and procedures—which are furnished to every member of the student body so that all might become familiar with them—are essential to the spirit of cooperation, compromise, and civil behavior which underlies productive human relationships. In short, the policies and procedures contained herein are the real-life mechanisms by which the University remains a place where essential rights and freedoms are preserved. These freedoms and rights include, but are not necessarily limited to, the freedom to teach, the freedom to learn and pursue truth no matter where that pursuit may lead, the freedom of speech, and the freedom of assembly. All communities must adopt whatever regulations their members require to ensure that conflict or misconduct does not diminish the rights of free people. Acceptance of and adherence to these fundamentals of freedom are necessary for continued membership in the community. When members of the University community consider what matters may require regulation by written code, these guidelines apply. 

  1. All the University’s resources must be fully employed in the intellectual and personal development of its students.
  2. Institutional regulations should be adopted only when necessary to the achievement of the University’s academic goals, the safety and freedom of individuals, or the orderly operation of the University.
  3. Students should be encouraged to participate, through orderly procedures, in the establishment and revision of regulations governing their conduct.
  4. Regulations should be clearly stated and made conveniently available to every student.
  5. Disciplinary action for violation of regulations should be corrective, rather than punitive. Depending upon the circumstances of a case, corrective action may entail separation from the University or expulsion.
  6. Disciplinary procedures should be consistent with the principles of due process, channels of appeal should be clearly defined, and information relating to appeals should be readily accessible to all students.

Institutional regulations cannot provide specifically for every question of conduct under every set of circumstances which might arise; they are intended to define the practices ordinarily necessary to maintain working order in a complex system and to protect the essential freedoms of everyone in the community.

Advice on and review of University policies and regulations rest with general University committees. Committees dealing with the activities of students include students. Representatives of the appropriate administrative offices serve as consultants to committee members.

Student, staff, and faculty members may introduce topics for the agenda, debate proposals, and vote on all recommendations. Student members can contribute most effectively to the work of the committees by maintaining regular lines of two-way communication with the student government and with other groups and individuals interested in their committees’ particular areas of concern. As members of the larger community of which the University is a part, students are entitled to all the rights and protections enjoyed by other members of that community. By the same token, students are also subject to all civil laws, whose enforcement is the responsibility of duly constituted civil authorities, with whom the University has a policy of full cooperation. It should be emphasized that when a student’s violation of civil law also adversely affects the orderly operation of the University, the University must enforce its own regulations regardless of any civil proceedings or dispositions.

Final authority in all cases rests with the University president and the State Board of Regents. Included here are the primary statements of University policies on rights and responsibilities of students. It is to your advantage to give them a careful reading and to keep your copy at hand for reference.

Interim changes in regulations are published by mass e-mail. A complete set of current general University regulations is always available in the Office of the Dean of Students. For information on curricular matters, consult the appropriate college office.


Student Records Policy

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), a federal law, affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. They are: (1) the right to inspect and review education records within 45 days of the day the University receives a request for access; (2) the right to request the amendment of the education records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading; (3) the right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent; and (4) the right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the University of Iowa to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The address of the Family Policy Compliance Office, which administers FERPA, is 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC, 20202-4605. Whether or not a student elects to contact the U.S. Department of Education, they are welcome to file an internal complaint with the University of Iowa Office of the Registrar (Room 2, Jessup Hall, reg-access-maui@uiowa.edu)

The University defines the following categories as directory information under FERPA: name; local address; permanent/hometown address; telephone number; photographs and video recordings of students in public and non-classroom settings; HawkID and UI e-mail address; major fields of study; college of enrollment; dates of attendance, including the current classification or year; full-time/part-time enrollment status; degrees, certificates, honors, scholarships and awards, not including monetary amounts, received as well as those applied for during the current academic term; height and weight of athletic team members; information about participation in officially recognized University activities and sports; information about participation in study abroad not including location; and employment information including: job title, department, work phone number, and work address when employed in a position that requires student status. The University’s online student directory lists only name, HawkID, UI e-mail address, college of enrollment, and employment information.    

The University has authority under FERPA to release directory information regarding a current or former student to anyone without the consent of the student. For students who request confidentiality of directory information, the University will not release directory information to the general public. Students interested in restricting the release of directory information via MyUI . To restrict your address using MyUI, go to Student Information > Student Life Management > Address Change/Update. Some student employees are not permitted to restrict their name, office address, e-mail, or office phone number.  

Directory information not restricted from release by the student is subject to public release and inclusion in University directories. 

Students are entitled to restrict the release of directory information, and former students may restrict address and telephone number.  A request to restrict directory information will remain in effect until revoked by the student in writing.

To facilitate the disclosure of student education record information, FERPA information release forms are available in department offices which maintain student records. In lieu of signing a FERPA information release form, a student may elect to authorize disclosure via the web using MyUI. The combination of a student’s HawkID and HawkID password at the University of Iowa is considered an electronic signature. The Office of the Registrar will respond to electronic requests for the release of transcripts and other personally identifiable information as long as each request is authenticated via the MyUI website or the Office of the Registrar website by logging in with a student’s HawkID and HawkID password.

FERPA permits disclosure of education record information without the student’s consent to school officials who have a legitimate educational interest in the information. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill their professional responsibility. A school official is a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the University has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, collection agent, or software vendor); a person serving on the Board of Regents; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing their tasks.  A volunteer or contractor outside of the University is considered a school official for purposes of this policy if they perform an institutional service or function for which the University would otherwise use its own employees and who is under the direct control of the University with respect to the use and maintenance of personally identifiable information from education records.

Not all information related to students is defined as education records under FERPA. For example, law enforcement records, medical records, and alumni records are not accessible as education records. Education record information may be released, moreover, under specified circumstances, and the University reserves the right to release student record information without the student’s prior permission as authorized by FERPA. For example, a student’s consent is not required prior to the release of unrestricted directory information or certain financial aid information, or in the case of a health or safety emergency. As required by a federal law enacted in 2008, University Police will notify appropriate parties in the event a residence hall resident is reported to be missing and is presumed to be in danger but cannot be located within the residence facility.  In the case of a resident under the age of 21, University Police will, upon receiving a report of a missing resident, IMMEDIATELY initiate a criminal investigation including contacting the parent or guardian of the resident and contacting the National Crime and Information Center as required under Section 3701 (a) of the Crime Control Act of 1990 in the event of a missing person emergency.  Residents are encouraged to update the next-of-kin contact information reported on the confidentiality card residents fill out during check in.  

FERPA and Iowa law may permit the release of certain disciplinary information without the student’s consent, such as the final disciplinary results of a crime of violence committed by a student, or parental notification of an alcohol or drug violation committed by a student under 21 years of age. In addition, FERPA permits student record information to be released without prior approval to testing agencies, accrediting organizations, parents of dependent students, victims of crimes of violence or nonforcible sex offenses, designated officials of the federal government or state government, or to individuals with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena. To request a copy of the final results of a disciplinary proceeding against a student who committed a violent offense, the victim of the offense should contact the Office of the Vice President for Student Life.  With respect to interinstitutional disclosure, the University intends to disclose education records without the student’s consent, to officials of another school, upon request, in which the student seeks or intends to enroll or where the student is already enrolled as long as the disclosure is for purposes related to the student's enrollment or transfer. For the purpose of evaluating and improving instructional programs, Iowa high schools and community colleges receive from the University a report containing aggregate academic progress data on the school’s graduates who are attending the University of Iowa.

Some courses both face-to-face and those offered over the World Wide Web or via a course management system like ICON (powered by Desire2Learn, WebCT, or Blackboard) may require the sharing of information like name, email address, phone, etc. with fellow classmates in order to facilitate classroom interaction.  This sharing of information for such courses is not prohibited by FERPA, and it may be expected of all students, even for a student who has placed a block on directory information. Before enrolling in a course, students are encouraged to discuss any concerns they have regarding the sharing of this type of information with the instructor.

In 1998, Congress enacted a law restricting student financial aid to persons convicted of certain illicit drug crimes (20 U.S.C. 1091(r)). The University, in complying with the requirements of this law, may disseminate certain information in the student’s record related to financial aid or criminal history to the Department of Education or other appropriate enforcement agency.

Student requests to inspect education records which are governed by FERPA should be submitted to the office which maintains the records at issue (e.g. registrar, dean, head of the academic department, or other appropriate official). The University official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected.

Students may also ask the University to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. The request should be made in writing to the University official responsible for the record and clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading.

Under FERPA, students are not entitled to copies of education records in every case. Students may have copies made of their records if necessary to assist their right to inspect and review the record, or when a disclosure is made to another institution. When provided, the fee for copies will be 20 cents per page. Cases in which the University may deny a request for copies of records include, but are not limited to, situations where the student lives within commuting distance of the University of Iowa; where the student has an unpaid financial obligation to the University; where there is an unresolved disciplinary action against the student; or where the education record requested is an exam or set of standardized test questions. Where copies are provided, the documents will be redacted to protect the rights of other students.

For additional relevant policies see the Operations Manual IV-6.


Student Complaints Concerning Faculty Action

Student complaints concerning actions of faculty members are pursued first through the mechanisms established in each college for this purpose. Although there is some variation among colleges, these mechanisms generally involve the following steps: 

  1. The student first should attempt to resolve the issue with the faculty member involved.
  2. Lacking a satisfactory outcome, the student should turn to the departmental executive officer, if any.
  3. If a satisfactory outcome still is not obtained, the student may take the matter to the collegiate dean.

The colleges of Education, Engineering, Liberal Arts and Sciences, Medicine, and Nursing have written policies and procedures for resolving complaints. In addition, some colleges (Dentistry, Engineering, Law, and Nursing) also have established an ombudsperson system as an alternative mechanism for handling student complaints. Information concerning the mechanisms established in a specific college is available in the collegiate dean’s office.

Graduate students should consult with the associate dean for academic affairs in the Graduate College concerning mechanisms for resolving complaints. Generally speaking, an academic complaint filed by a graduate student will be resolved without respect to the grievant’s employment status. Employment-related grievances are resolved in one of two ways. Graduate students who are not members of the UE-COGS bargaining unit should refer to the general University student-employee grievance protocol set forth in Section I below (“Student Employee Grievance Procedure”). For graduate student assistants, the procedure contained within the collective bargaining agreement between the State Board of Regents and the United Electrical & Machine Workers Union, Local 896-COGS, is the exclusive remedy for resolving employment-related grievances.

A student dissatisfied with the outcome of an academic complaint against a faculty member at the collegiate level may ask the Office of the Provost to review the matter. In addition, a student dismissed from a college or from the University for academic reasons may ask the Office of the Provost to review the matter. The function of a review by the Office of the Provost is to ensure (a) that the outcome was supported by substantial evidence in the record when the record is viewed as a whole, and (b) that relevant procedures of the department and/or college were followed. Appeal to the Office of the Provost should include: (a) a letter from the student explaining in what way the outcome was not supported by substantial evidence and/or relevant procedures were not followed; and (b) copies of all previous documents provided by or to the student in the departmental and collegiate reviews.

If a student’s complaint concerning a faculty member’s action cannot be resolved through the mechanisms described above, the student may file a formal complaint of violation of the Statement on Professional Ethics and Academic Responsibility as described in section III-15 of the University Operations Manual (http://opsmanual.uiowa.edu/human-resources/professional-ethics-and-academic-responsibility). Such a complaint will be handled following the Faculty Dispute Procedures established for dealing with alleged ethical violations, found in section III-29.7 of the University Operations Manual, on the web at: http://opsmanual.uiowa.edu/human-resources/faculty-dispute-procedures/ethics.


Student Complaints Concerning Actions By Teaching Assistants

A student who has a complaint about a class, discussion section or laboratory for which a teaching assistant has responsibility should pursue the following procedure:

  1. The student first should attempt to resolve the complaint by discussing it directly with the teaching assistant.
  2. If the matter is not resolved satisfactorily or if discussion with the TA is deemed inappropriate, the student should discuss the complaint with the faculty member responsible for the course or the DEO of the department offering the course.
  3. If the complaint is not resolved at the departmental level, the student may take it to the dean’s office.
  4. If the complaint is not resolved at the collegiate level, the student may take it to the Provost, who will review the complaint.

The function of a review by the Office of the Provost is to ensure (a) that the outcome was supported by substantial evidence in the record when the record is viewed as a whole, and (b) that relevant procedures of the department and/or college were followed. Appeal to the Office of the Provost should include: (a) a letter from the student explaining in what way the outcome was not supported by substantial evidence and/or relevant procedures were not followed; and (b) copies of all previous documents provided by or to the student in the departmental and collegiate reviews.

 


University Policy on Human Rights

Please see http://opsmanual.uiowa.edu/community-policies/human-rights


Office of the University Ombudsperson

The Office of the Ombudsperson provides informal conflict resolution to help students, staff and faculty deal with questions or problems.  The office is:

  • Confidential.  We will not share any information you give us with anyone outside the Office of the Ombudsperson without your permission.  The only exceptions are when we become aware of possible physical harm to someone or when a court orders the office to provide information.
  • Neutral.  We don’t advocate for individuals but help everyone involved in a situation reach a solution that works for them.
  • Informal.  We help people resolve issues early and directly.  We don’t get involved in grievance procedures or legal proceedings.
  • Independent. We operate independently from university administration.

How can we help?  We can: 

  • Help visitors figure out their options.
  • Provide information on policies and procedures.
  • Refer to other resources when necessary.
  • Contact the other people involved to gather more information.
    Help to work out solutions through negotiation, mediation, or facilitated discussions.

The Ombudsperson may be contacted at any point in a situation and can offer guidance when visitors do not know where to begin to address a problem, when sensitive issues are involved, or as a last resort, when other channels haven’t worked. 

Office hours are 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.  We encourage appointments, but phone calls, emails, letters, and drop-ins are welcome.  Our phone number is 319-335-3608, and our email address is ombudsperson@uiowa.edu.  We are located on the Third Floor of the Jefferson Building at 129 E. Jefferson Building.  Please visit our website at http://www.uiowa.edu/ombuds/ for more information about our office. 


University Policy on Sexual Harassment

Please see http://opsmanual.uiowa.edu/community-policies/sexual-harassment


University Policy on Consensual Relationships Involving Students

Please see http://opsmanual.uiowa.edu/community-policies/consensual-relationships-involving-students


University Policy on Anti-Harassment

Please see http://opsmanual.uiowa.edu/community-policies/anti-harassment


Student Employee Grievance Procedure

Please see http://opsmanual.uiowa.edu/human-resources/student-employee-grievance-procedure


Complaints of Discrimination

Discrimination Complaints

Complaints alleging discrimination based on race, creed, color, religion, national origin, age, sex, pregnancy, disability, genetic information, status as a U.S. veteran, service in the U.S. military, sexual orientation, gender identity, associational preference, or any other classification that deprives the person of consideration as an individual, may be brought to the Office of Equal Opportunity & Diversity (EOD) pursuant to the Policy on Human Rights. Any student, staff member, or faculty member may file a complaint of discrimination with the Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity against any other member of the university community who is believed to have violated the policy. Where appropriate, such complaints may be filed against units, departments, or other organizational components of the University.

Discrimination complaints may be filed as either informal or formal complaints with the Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity.

For more information, consult the EOD-Complaint Investigations Unit website.

Harassment Complaints

Similarly, persons who believe they have been the target of harassment based upon their protected class status, may contact the Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity’s Complaint Investigations Unit to discuss filing a complaint under the university’s Anti-Harassment Policy.

This policy addresses harassment in all forms based on any classification covered by law and/or the university’s Human Rights Policy (with the exception of sexual harassment, which is addressed in the university’s Interim Policy on Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct, as well as harassment based on other factors as set forth in this policy. 

The purpose of this policy is to prevent harassment within the University of Iowa community and to provide a process for addressing all forms of harassment if and when they occur. To review the complete policy, please see: http://opsmanual.uiowadu/community-policies/anti-harassment.

Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct

Complaints of sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, dating/domestic violence, and/or stalking are governed by the Interim Policy on Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct

The University takes all incidents of sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, dating/domestic violence, and/or stalking very seriously. A student may make a UI policy complaint about sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, dating/domestic violence, and/or stalking by contacting the Office of the Sexual Misconduct Response Coordinator at 319-335-6200.

A student may also make a criminal complaint about sexual misconduct, dating/domestic violence, and/or stalking to the appropriate law enforcement authorities, which would be the UI Department of Public Safety (319-335-5022) in the case of misconduct that occurs on campus. Not all sexual misconduct, dating/domestic violence, and stalking is criminal behavior. Law enforcement authorities can assist a student in determining whether the conduct experienced was criminal in nature and warrants a criminal complaint.

A student may need support when talking with law enforcement or University administrators. Students are entitled to be assisted by a certified victim advocate at every stage of the process and are encouraged to consult with the victim advocate and bring the victim advocate to meetings.

For more information consult the following websites/offices:

Office of the Sexual Misconduct Response Coordinator
Website               https://osmrc.uiowa.edu/
Tel.                         319-335-6200

 

Equal Opportunity & Diversity- Complaint Investigations Unit
Website               https://diversity.uiowa.edu/office/equal-opportunity-and-diversity
Tel.                         319-335-0705


Disability Protection Policy

The University of Iowa, as authorized by Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Vietnam Era Veterans Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974, shall take affirmative steps to employ and advance the employment of qualified individuals with disabilities and qualified disabled veterans and veterans of the Vietnam Era at all levels of employment. The affirmative action policy applies to, but is not limited to, the following employment practices: Hiring, Upgrading, Demotion, Transfer, Recruitment, Recruitment Advertising, Layoff, Termination, Rates of Pay/Order Forms of Compensation, Selection for Training (including Apprenticeship).

The University of Iowa endeavors to make reasonable accommodations for the functional limitations of applicants, employees, and students with disabilities and disabled veterans pursuant to applicable federal and state law. Applicants and employees with disabilities seeking accommodations should contact Faculty and Staff Disability Services (https://hr.uiowa.edu/fsds/). Students with disabilities should contact Student Disability Services (https://sds.studentlife.uiowa.edu/students/).

Applicants, employees, and students with disabilities at the University of Iowa are protected from coercion, retaliation, interferences, or discrimination for filing a complaint or assisting in an investigation of a complaint under the aforementioned acts. Inquiries and complaints should be directed to the Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity.

Disabled applicants/employees, disabled veterans, or veterans of the Vietnam Era desiring more information should contact the Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity. To obtain a copy of the Affirmative Action Plan for Persons with Disabilities, Disabled Veterans, and Veterans of the Vietnam Era, see https://diversity.uiowa.edu/office/equal-opportunity-and-diversity.


Anti-Retaliation Policy

Please see http://opsmanual.uiowa.edu/community-policies/anti-retaliation


Statement of Religious Diversity and the University Calendar

Religious history, religious diversity, and spiritual values have formed a part of The University of Iowa’s curricular and extracurricular programs since the founding of the University. In order to advance religious diversity on campus, the University makes reasonable accommodations for students, staff, and faculty whose religious holy days coincide with their work schedules and classroom assignments. As a public institution, the University neither promotes any particular form of religion nor discriminates against students, staff, or faculty on the basis of their religious viewpoints.

University holidays are not religious holy days, although a religious holy day may coincide with a University holiday. The University is prepared to make reasonable accommodations in its work assignments, test schedules, and classroom attendance expectations in a manner which is consistent with the University Policy on Human Rights and does not unfairly burden employees and students.

Students

With regard to classroom attendance, students who notify the faculty (including teaching assistants) of a religious holy day conflict in a timely manner shall be excused from class or other scheduled academic activity to observe a religious holy day of their faith. Where attendance is mandatory, students compelled by their religious convictions to refrain from attending class on specific days must notify their instructors during the first few days of the semester or session, and no later than the third week or one week before the absence if a conflict occurs before that time.

Students who notify their instructors of a religious holy day conflict in a timely manner shall be permitted a reasonable amount of time to make up the material or activities covered in their absence, including tests. Students who receive an exemption on religious grounds cannot be penalized for failing to attend class on the days exempted. The instructor may, however, appropriately respond if the student fails to satisfactorily complete any alternative assignment or examination.

In those cases where a request for an excused absence based upon a religious holy day conflict is denied by the instructor, a student may pursue a grievance under “Student Complaints Concerning Faculty Actions” (posted in Policies & Regulations Affecting Students, sub-section D). Where a timely request is made but denied by the instructor, the grievance process shall be expedited as much as reasonably possible to ensure that a student pursuing a religious holy day accommodation is not unduly disadvantaged by the passage of time.

Students with attendance conflicts may be required to notify an instructor in writing. An instructor who requires written notice must inform the class of this expectation in the class syllabus. An instructor may deny a student’s request for an excused absence on the ground that the request was not made within a reasonable time period, that is, no later than the third week of class or one week before the absence if a conflict occurs before that time.

Faculty

Faculty members have “the responsibility to meet classes as scheduled and, when circumstances prevent this, to arrange equivalent alternate instruction” (University of Iowa Operations Manual, Section III, Chapter 15.2.b). Faculty members who wish to observe religious holy days must fulfill the above-mentioned policy and satisfy any other responsibilities regarding off-campus time, including proper notice, in accordance with their standard departmental procedures.

When scheduling tests, instructors are encouraged to take cognizance of religious holy days which fall on University class days. In addition, faculty should include in their syllabi information regarding the policies for handling conflicts between classroom activities (attendance, tests, etc.) and religious holy days. Such policies must be consistent with University policies (see the section for “Students” above).

Staff

Staff members may request accommodation for religious observances through their immediate supervisor. Accommodation may be in the form of scheduled leave or an alternate work schedule. Approved absences will be recorded as vacation. In cases when vacation is not available or an alternative work schedule is not possible, a leave of absence without pay may be permitted. Departments will attempt to accommodate such requests, balancing the request to accommodate with the particular needs of the work unit.

In order to best meet staff needs in an area, appropriate advance notice is required.

Bmindful Website Listing Major Holy Days

The Bmindful calendar lists the major religious holy days for 2019 – 2021, where religious observers are likely to stay home from work or school. The calendar was reviewed and approved by the Consultation for Religious Communities of Johnson County and the Inter-Religious Council of Linn County. The local convention and visitors' bureau updates the calendar yearly to ensure event organizers have a list of dates through the upcoming three years.

In partnership with the Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity, ITS provides a quick method to add the BMindful Holy Days Calendar to an electronic calendar. Choose your electronic calendar type and read the instructions at https://its.uiowa.edu/support/article/105264.


Interim Policy on Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct

Please see https://osmrc.uiowa.edu/interim-policy-sexual-harassment-and-sexual-misconduct


Sanctioning Guidelines for Sexual Assault

General

The University of Iowa strives to create a respectful, safe, and welcoming environment for students, faculty, staff, and visitors. The Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct Policy sets forth resources available to students, describes prohibited conduct, and establishes procedures for responding to sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, and related retaliation.

When a student is found responsible for sexual assault, the following guidelines will be utilized by the Sanctioning Administrator, which in student cases is typically the Director of Student Accountability. In all cases, the sanctions assigned to a student found responsible will depend on the full context in which the offense takes place. The Sanctioning Administrator is expected to use judgment in applying these sanctioning guidelines.

Respondents who are found responsible for multiple policy violations in a single incident or who have previously been found responsible for sexual harassment or sexual misconduct can expect to be assigned more severe sanctions.

These guidelines address status sanctions (whether a student may continue their education at the university). In some cases, additional sanctions may be assigned (e.g., a requirement to complete educational programming, like the UI-CERB program, which is aimed at increasing the use of respectful, adaptive, healthy behaviors in relationships).

Sexual Assault Sanctioning

Students who are found responsible for committing sexual assault as defined in the Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct Policy will experience serious repercussions.

The Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct Policy defines “sexual assault” as “an offense classified as forcible or nonforcible sex offense under the uniform crime reporting system of the Federal Bureau of Investigation,” including sex offenses, fondling, incest, statutory rape, and rape, each of which is further defined in the policy.  (OM, II-4.)

Rape, Statutory Rape, and Incest

Sanctions for rape, statutory rape, and incest will normally range from multi-semester suspension to expulsion from the university, with expulsion being the most likely sanction.

Attempted Rape, Statutory Rape, and Incest

Sanctions for attempted rape, attempted statutory rape, and attempted incest will normally range from probation to expulsion.

Fondling

Sanctions for fondling or attempted fondling will normally range from probation to expulsion from the university.

Additional factors for consideration

Depending on the specifics of the incident, more or less severe sanctions may be imposed. In determining the appropriate discipline, the University will also consider the following factors:

  • use of force, use of a weapon or display of a weapon
  • isolation, intentional incapacitation or other indications of predatory behavior;
  • evidence that the conduct was unintentional;
  • the wishes of the Complainant or other individuals impacted by the conduct as determined to be appropriate in the discretion of the Sanctioning Administrator;
  • prior misconduct by the Respondent, including the Respondent’s relevant prior discipline history, both at the University or elsewhere (if known), including criminal convictions;
  • whether the Respondent accepted responsibility for the conduct;
  • maintenance of a safe and respectful educational and employment environment;
  • protection of the University community; and,
  • any other mitigating, aggravating, or compelling circumstances to reach a just and appropriate resolution.


In some instances, completion of all academic credits necessary for conferral of a degree may weigh in favor of multi-semester suspension rather than expulsion. 

For further information about sanctions, see Section 4.23(ah) of the Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct Policy.


Code of Student Life (2021-2022 academic year)

Copied below is the 2021-22 academic year version of the Code of Student Life, which rules are applicable to reports occurring on or after August 15, 2021.

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, students are asked to comply with expectations outlined at coronavirus.uiowa.edu

For any incidents that occurred before August 15, 2021, please use the 2020-2021 Code of Student Life.

  • Section A: Introduction

    What does it mean to be a Hawkeye?

    At the University of Iowa, students, staff, faculty, and others are joined together in a unique and tight-knit community. Our community embraces our core values of diversity, equity, and inclusion while continuing to protect academic freedom and promote free expression. These goals are embodied in the IOWA Challenge, and they illustrate what it means to be a true Hawkeye. We excel not only not only as individuals, but also as a community, by pushing ourselves to excel intellectually. We stretch ourselves to experience new, unfamiliar things. We engage in innovative activities and coursework that make a difference in people’s lives and help shape our community. We choose to work hard, to try and be the best versions of ourselves, and to hold ourselves—and each other—accountable for our actions. Finally, we know that while we are here to serve each other, when we leave, we are prepared to serve the world. This is what it means to be a Hawkeye.

    The Code of Student Life

    The purpose of the Code of Student Life is to help students learn and grow to become the best version of themselves, so they are better equipped to embody the IOWA Challenge, positively contributing to the Hawkeye community and beyond. This document establishes a framework to ensure our Hawkeye community achieves and upholds the goals and values listed above. The University is committed to due process and fairness when applying these rules and engaging in the Student Accountability Process. When you become a Hawkeye, you agree to understand and abide by the rules listed in the code, recognizing that this document helps us maintain a safe, healthy, respectful, supportive, and flourishing community, embodying the meaning of being a Hawkeye.  

  • Section B: Authority
    1. Pursuant to Iowa Administrative Code, the President is the Chief Administrative Officer for the University of Iowa. The President has nominated, and the Board of Regents has appointed, a Vice President for Student Life with overall responsibility for student-related matters, including but not limited to student conduct and discipline. The Vice President for Student Life has, in turn, delegated considerable authority for the establishment of rules and handling of rule and policy violations to the Associate Vice President and Dean of Students and designees, including the Assistant Dean and Director of Student Accountability, as well as staff of the Office of Student Accountability (OSA) and of University Housing and Dining.
    2. A full and complete text of the Code of Student Life and other general University rules and regulations of personal conduct currently in effect, including all amendments, must be on file in the Office of the Dean of Students at all times and must be available for inspection by students.
    3. This code may be amended at any time by authority of the President of the University. Amendments are effective upon approval by the President and publication on the Dean of Students website, provided that students have been notified of the amendment by mass electronic mailing, which will be conclusively presumed as adequate notice to all students. 

  • Section C: Definitions

    Campus Buildings – Buildings leased, owned, and operated by the University of Iowa. This includes academic buildings, campus facilities, and university residence halls.

    Property – Goods, personal belongings, buildings, equipment, automobiles, landscaping, real estate and all other tangible things.

    Reasonable Person – A standard which the Office of Student Accountability uses to assess if the alleged behavior described in an incident was a violation of the Code of Student Life. Specifically, a “reasonable person” means how an ordinarily prudent and rational person under similar circumstances and with similar identities would be expected to react.

    Responding Student – A student who has allegedly engaged in behavior that may be a violation of the Code of Student Life. This term specifically refers to instances when the University has sent a letter to a student alleging that specific rules or policies have been violated, and that the matter will be addressed through the Student Accountability Procedure.

    University Instructors – Individuals leading students in the educational or research efforts of the university, including faculty members, teaching assistants, and research assistants.

    Weapon – Serviceable firearms, taser, ammunition, explosives, fireworks, or other dangerous articles, paintball markers and other devices that fire projectiles, and devices that resemble serviceable weapons such as a pellet gun or toy gun that a reasonable observer would believe to be a gun. This also includes other weapons or dangerous objects such as arrows, axes, machetes, nun chucks, throwing stars, or non-cooking knives with a blade of longer than four inches.

  • Section D: Jurisdiction

    1. Applicable Policies, Rules, and Regulations

    Any student is subject to discipline by the University of Iowa Office of Student Accountability (OSA) if they are found to have engaged in behavior prohibited by policies, rules, or regulations of The University of Iowa that occur within the jurisdictional reach of the University of Iowa.

    Applicable policies, rules, or regulations include but are not limited to:

    a. The Code of Student Life
    b. The University Operations Manual, Section II (Community Policies) and Section IV (Students)
    c. The Board of Regents, State of Iowa, policies and rules related to Students
    d. The Interim Policy on Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct https://osmrc.uiowa.edu/interim-policy-sexual-harassment-and-sexual-misconduct 
    e. Discipline of Registered Student Organizations https://dos.uiowa.edu/policies/discipline-of-registered-student-organizations/
    f. Acceptable Use of Information Technology Resources https://opsmanual.uiowa.edu/community-policies/acceptable-use-information-technology-resources
    g. University of Iowa Housing and Dining policies

    In consultation with the applicable office, OSA may also enforce or apply policies, rules, or regulations communicated by any University of Iowa College, Department, Unit, Program, Office or Facility

    2. Discipline Based On Office of Institutional Integrity Findings

    As required, the Office of Student Accountability will consult with the Title IX Coordinator to determine and impose appropriate sanctions for any student found responsible for violating the Interim Policy on Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct.  https://opsmanual.uiowa.edu/community-policies/interim-policy-sexual-harassment-and-sexual-misconduct

    The Office of Student Accountability further will consult with the Director of Discrimination and ADA Compliance to determine and impose appropriate sanctions for any student found responsible for violating university policies related to bias, harassment, discrimination, equity, or free speech by the Office for Institutional Equity. 

    3. Constitutional Rights

    a. No policy, rule, or regulation can be interpreted in a way that conflicts with a student’s protected rights under The United States Constitution or The Constitution of the State of Iowa.
    b. Nothing in this code can be interpreted to override a student’s right to Freedom of Expression under the First Amendment of The United States Constitution. In keeping with our values of diversity, equity, and inclusion, we note that the principle of “Freedom of Speech” does have recognized limits such that a student could be subject to discipline if that speech constitutes Threatening Behavior (E.10), Terroristic Threats (E.11), Undue Harassment (E.17).
    c. The University’s Office of Institutional Equity is charged with implementation of equal opportunity, affirmative action, and diversity policies, including compliance with federal/state laws and university policy prohibiting discrimination based on protected classes.

    4. Who is considered a “Student” for these purposes?

    a. Whether school is in session or not, you are a "STUDENT” of The University of Iowa if at least one of the following is true:

    1. You have been accepted to any academic program of The University of Iowa
    2. You are admitted to any college of The University of Iowa
    3. You are registered in courses at the University

    i. full-time
    ii. part-time
    iii. including distance learning courses or others

    4. You are enrolled in a University-sponsored program, including, but not limited to:

    i. Orientation
    ii. Study abroad
    iii. The 2 Plus 2 plan
    iv. The REACH Program

    5. You are also considered a “student” until actual awarding of a degree

    i. If your degree has not yet been awarded, it may be held until the student accountability process is completed and all sanctions, if applicable, have been satisfactorily completed, even if you have satisfied academic requirements for the degree (graduate or undergraduate).

    b. Withdrawal (including during a semester) does not end jurisdiction under these rules for acts while you were a student.
    c. If you are not currently registered for a particular term, you are still considered a student for these purposes for twelve months after you are no longer registered in any course or program of the University of Iowa, unless you would be required to re-apply for admission. 
    d. If you are not currently registered, but a report is filed against you, the Director of OSA may:

    i. Proceed with an investigation, or
    ii. Restrict future registration, delay investigation, and/or resolve the report at a later date when or if you seek to register in a university course or program.

    5. What locations are considered within the jurisdictional reach of The University of Iowa under these rules?

    a. The University of Iowa asserts jurisdiction over behavior which occurs on-campus. On-campus is defined under the Code of Student Life as:

    1. University-owned or leased property
    2. Streets & pathways contiguous to or in the immediate vicinity of campus
    3. University housing

    a. Residence Halls
    b. Apartments

    4. Property, facilities, and leased premises of organizations affiliated with the University, including fraternity and sorority chapter dwellings

    b. The University of Iowa asserts jurisdiction over off-campus behavior that affects a clear and distinct interest of the University. The Director of the Office of Student Accountability makes the determination of “clear and distinct interest” by considering whether the behavior:

    1. Is directed at a University student or other member of the University community
    2. Occurs at a University-sponsored or authorized activity, including:

    a. sporting or other event,
    b. educational activity, such as

    i. internship
    ii. service-learning experience
    iii. field trip
    iv. during a study-abroad

    c. student organization-sponsored activity.

    3. Occurs while either involved party was acting in an official capacity for the University
    4. Constitutes a violation of:

    a. federal law
    b. state law or ordinance
    c. local law or ordinance
    d. Demonstrates a threat to campus safety and security, no matter where it occurs

    5. Involves alcohol, drugs, or acts of violence (or threats of violence) in Johnson County, IA. Such behaviors are presumed to demonstrate a threat to campus safety and security
    6. Or, otherwise affects a clear and distinct interest as articulated by the Office of Student Accountability

    c. The University of Iowa asserts jurisdiction over some on-line or electronic behaviors. It is often difficult to determine the precise location of online or electronic activities. For this reason, the University of Iowa asserts that online or electronic behaviors by a University of Iowa student are considered to affect a clear and distinct interest of the University, so long as the behavior is not protected expression under either The United States Constitution or The Constitution of the State of Iowa.

    6. The Student Accountability Process

    a. The procedures used by OSA to determine whether a student has violated a policy, rule or regulation are found in the Accountability Procedures.
    b. Disagreement with jurisdiction under this Code may be raised with the investigator(s) during the investigation process.
    c. Proceedings under the Code of Student Life may be initiated against students charged with a violation of a federal, state, or local law or ordinance. These proceedings may be carried out before, at the same time, or after civil or criminal proceedings. Decisions about the timing of University proceedings will be within the sole discretion of the Director of Student Accountability.
    d. If a student violates policies, rules, or regulations within University of Iowa Housing and Dining facilities, they are generally subject to the procedures followed by Housing and Dining. However, the Director of OSA may choose to transfer the matter to the Office of Student Accountability.
    e. For a Student University employee, misconduct may be resolved under the Code of Student Life, Human Resources policies, and/or the policies administered by the Office of Institutional Equity.

  • Section E: Prohibited Misconduct

    Any student found to have committed any of the following listed behaviors and within the jurisdiction of this policy, as defined in Section D, is subject to discipline by The University of Iowa, Office of Student Accountability and its designees.

    General Behaviors

    1. Academic Misconduct
    2. Criminal Conduct
    3. Collusion
    4. Use of Falsified Documents

    Interference with University Operations

    5. Disruptive Behavior
    6. Failure to Comply with University Directive
    7. Trespassing
    8. Abuse of the Student Accountability System
    9. Misuse of IT Resources

    Behavior Endangering Health or Safety

    10. Threatening Behavior
    11. Terroristic Threat(s)
    12. Self-Destructive Behavior
    13. Alcohol Misconduct
    14. Use or Possession of Drugs or Drug Paraphernalia
    15. Smoking

    Harm to Person's or Property

    16. Assaultive Behavior
    17. Undue Harassment
    18. Theft
    19. Vandalism
    20. Use or Possession of Weapons
    21. Arson/Fire Violations
    22. Explosives and Combustibles
    23. Unauthorized Audio/Video/Photo
    24. Hazing

  • General Behaviors: E.1 - E.4

    E.1 Academic Misconduct
    Any dishonest or fraudulent conduct related to an academic exercise, such as

      • cheating
      • plagiarism
      • forgery
      • misrepresentation regarding the circumstances of the above, grades, a student’s non-attendance, late assignment, status of matriculation, previous work or educational experience
      • assisting, (including aiding or abetting) another person to do any of the above

    “Dishonest” conduct includes, but is not limited to, attempts by students to cheat, misrepresent, aid, or abet another person to do the same, whether or not the attempts are successful. 

    Academic exercises covered by this rule include:

      • classroom assignments (such as examinations, papers, or research)
      • out-of-classroom activities that are related to an academic exercise at or through the University (resumes, transcripts, interviews, projects, practicum, internship and/or externship assignments off campus, University employment, or discussions with University Instructors, staff or administration for example). 

    A “classroom” can be a lecture hall, class or discussion room, virtual instructional setting, laboratory, or clinic, for example. 

    The acquisition of honors, awards, degrees, academic record notations, course enrollments, credits, grades, or certifications (including language proficiency or professional licensure or other endorsement) by any dishonest means is strictly prohibited. 

    Resolution of academic misconduct reports will be handled within the college or department concerned, with provision for appeal (see the Academic Misconduct policy for more information). 

    E.2 Criminal Conduct
    A violation of any federal, state, or local law or ordinance.

      • May include a violation of a court order
      • May include failure to comply with law enforcement warnings (including harassment or trespass warnings)

    E.3 Collusion

      • Assisting (including colluding, aiding, or abetting),
      • Encouraging (including inciting), or
      • Attempting to assist or encourage
      • Another individual to commit a violation of any University policy, rule, or regulation.

    E.4 Use of Falsified Documents
    Knowingly possessing or furnishing to any University employee or office, or providing to third-parties:

      • False, falsified, or forged
      • Documents, identification, materials, accounts, records, or financial instruments

  • Interference with University Operations: E.5 - E.9

    E.5 Disruptive Behavior

    Behavior which disrupts the orderly operation of authorized University activities. 

    This includes behavior in the following locations:

      • In an instructional setting, which includes classrooms, online, or examination settings
      • In a laboratory or other research setting
      • At a location used for the operation or administration of University business, including temporary locations
      • At an on-campus location hosting an authorized non-University activity or
      • At University activities held on-campus or off-campus

    This also specifically includes the following behaviors from any location:

      • Interfering with a University instructor’s ability to teach or manage the instructional setting.
      • Substantially interfering with a student’s ability to learn
      • Inhibiting access to facilities, pedestrian pathways or vehicular traffic
      • Disrupting or hindering emergency services, investigations, or disciplinary proceedings
      • Falsely reporting an emergency or terroristic threat in any form
      • Tampering with or improper activation of fire prevention equipment, fire alarm or smoke detector on campus.
      • Protesting or demonstrating within the interior of any property owned, leased or controlled by the University, except as specifically authorized by the University.
        • Authorized protests or demonstrations may be subject to reasonable conditions to protect the rights and safety of other persons and to prevent damage to property.

    Besides actions taken by the Office of Student Accountability under the Student Accountability Procedure, a University instructor has the authority to respond to disruptive actions by:

      • Determining classroom seating patterns or
      • Imposing a one-day suspension by requiring that a student immediately exit the instructional setting

    Instructors who impose a one-day suspension are asked to report the incident to the Office of Student Accountability and the appropriate department and college for determination if additional action is needed.

    E.6 Failure to Comply with University Directive

    a. A failure to comply with the reasonable directive(s) of any University employee when that employee is acting in the performance of their duties.

    This specifically includes:

      • Failure to identify yourself when requested to do so
      • Intentional or reckless failure to comply with a reasonable directive from a University instructor

    b. Besides proceedings by the Office of Student Accountability, a University instructor has the authority to respond to an intentional or reckless failure to comply by:

    • Determining classroom seating patterns or
    • Imposing a one-day suspension by requiring that a student immediately exit the instructional or research setting

    Instructors who impose a one-day suspension are asked to report the incident to the Office of Student Accountability and the appropriate department and college for determination if additional action is needed.

    E.7 Trespassing
    Trespassing includes:

      • Unauthorized entry into or unauthorized occupation of any campus buildings or other campus property
      • Unauthorized or improper use of University property, including but not limited to equipment or facilities.
      • Unauthorized possession, use, or duplication of University keys, cards, codes, or other methods of access.

    E.8 Abuse of the Student Accountability System
    Abuse of the Student Accountability System, includes:

      • Disruption or interference with the orderly conduct of a proceeding governed by the Accountability Procedure;
      • Falsification, distortion, or misrepresentation to a University investigator, official, hearing officer, or adjudicator as part of the Accountability Procedures; or

    Failure to comply with interim or final sanction(s) imposed pursuant to a report of misconduct and/or hearing governed by the Accountability Procedures.

    E.9 Misuse of IT Resources
    Behavior which violates the University's Acceptable Use of Information Technology Resources policy, including attempting to do so or assisting another to do so.

    In summary, Students violate this policy by:

      • Disrupting access of other students, University Instructors, or staff members to University computer or other IT resources;
      • Obtaining or using a password or account assigned to another person without permission from that person;
      • Using University computer or other IT resources to interfere with the rights of others, including damaging programs or equipment belonging to another;
      • Sending harassing or threatening material electronically;
      • Accessing confidential information without proper authorization;
      • Duplicating copyrighted software unlawfully; or
      • Downloading from the internet and/or uploading to the internet a copyrighted music file or video file using University computer equipment, University IT, or the University network without express permission from the copyright holder.

  • Behavior Endangering Health or Safety: E.10 - E.15

    E.10 Threatening Behavior
    Threatening behavior, written or verbal, causing a reasonable person to believe that the person making the threat:

      • Intended to carry out the threat to harm their health, safety, or property, and
      • Had the ability to carry out the threat

    Online / internet threats are examples of threatening behavior when there is severe behavior that fulfills the above and when the behaviors are not protected by the Freedom of Expression outlined in the U.S. Constitution.

    E.11 Terroristic Threat 
    Issuing a credible and substantial threat of:

      • Violence
      • Use of a weapon, including guns
      • A bomb or explosive device
      • Use of a chemical or biological agent

    E.12 Self-Destructive Behavior
    Behavior which harms or threatens to harm the health or safety of oneself. Self-destructive behavior that poses an actual risk to the student’s health or safety is one type of misconduct that falls within the scope of this policy.

    E.13 Alcohol Misconduct.
    Consumption, possession, distribution, or sale of alcoholic beverages in violation of the law or University Policy.

      • No alcohol in campus buildings and on campus property
      • Alcohol use resulting in transport to the hospital by emergency medical personnel.
      • This includes, but is not limited to the following criminal charges:
        • Public Intoxication
        • Possession of Alcohol Under the Legal Age
        • Operating a Vehicle While Intoxicated
      • This includes policies expressed specifically for students living in the Residence Halls. See Rules F.1 and F.2 for more information.

    E.14 Use or Possession of Drugs or Drug Paraphernalia.
    Consumption, possession, distribution, or sale of drugs, narcotics or other controlled substances in violation of the law or University Policy.

      • No drugs or controlled substances in campus buildings and on campus property
      • Drugs include controlled substances, and substances that may be detrimental to health, even though not subject to state and federal laws.
      • This includes the consumption, possession, distribution of one’s own prescription drugs that are not prescribed to the person receiving or using the substance.
      • Drug use resulting in transport to the hospital by emergency medical personnel.
      • This includes, but is not limited to the following criminal charges:
        • Public Intoxication
        • Possession of a Controlled Substance
        • Possession of Drug Paraphernalia
        • Operating a Vehicle While Intoxicated
      • This includes policies expressed specifically for students living in the Residence Halls. See Rule F.3 for more information.

    E.15 Smoking. 
    The use of tobacco is prohibited on campus

    This includes:

      • smokeless tobacco products (including chewing tobacco, vaporizers, e-cigarettes and other electronic nicotine delivery systems, and hookahs)
      • legal smoking products

  • Harm to Persons or Property: E.16 - E.24

    E.16 Assaultive Behavior
    Any unwelcome physical contact that is directed at a specific person and is intentional or reckless.

    This includes:

      • Striking
      • Slapping
      • Hitting
      • Punching
      • Shoving
      • Kicking another person 
      • Other contact of similar intensity or seriousness

    Self-defense, as defined by The Iowa Code, can be considered for sanctioning purposes.

    E.17 Undue Harassment
    Intentional behavior which is directed:

      • toward a specific person, and
      • without legitimate purpose

    Which a reasonable person would find

      • intimidates,
      • alarms,
      • or attempts to control another person’s behavior

    And results in a significant disruption of the person’s:

      • On-campus employment
      • Educational performance
      • On-campus living, or
      • Participation in a University activity (on or off campus)
      • May be towards multiple people as an identifiable group
      • The behavior must be intentional, not the impact
      • A “reasonable person” is defined in Section C.
      • “intimidation” means implied threats or acts that cause a reasonable fear of harm
      • This includes repeatedly contacting a person who has previously communicated that they do not wish to be contacted even if there is no provable disruption.

    Bullying and cyberbullying are examples of undue harassment in which there is repeated and/or severe behavior that intimidates, intentionally harms, or attempts to control another person’s behavior, when the behaviors are not protected by Freedom of Expression in the U.S. Constitution.

    E.18 Theft   
    Taking of property that does not belong to the student.

    This includes:

      • Intentional and unauthorized taking of University property;
      • Possession of stolen property;
      • Attempt of any the listed behaviors;
      • “Property” as defined in Section C; and
      • Unauthorized use of a:
        • Credit card
        • Debit card
        • Student identification card
        • Cell phone
        • Personal identification number
        • University Bill account information or
        • Personal check.

    E.19 Vandalism
    Intentional or reckless destruction, damage, defacement, misuse or mutilation of

      • University property
      • University structures (for example: buildings or grounds) or
      • Property that does not belong to the student.

    This includes: 

      • Attempt of any the listed behaviors
      • “Property” as defined in Section C.

    E.20 Use or Possession of Weapons.
    Use or possession of weapons on campus, unless otherwise permitted by law. 

      • On campus, as defined in Section D, includes the storage of any item that falls within the category of a weapon in a vehicle parked on campus property.
      • "Weapon" as defined in Section C.
      • Although non-projectile high-voltage pulse weapons are permissible on the University campus, they are prohibited in any facility leased, owned, or operated by University of Iowa Health Care, as well as University stadiums.

    E.21 Arson/Fire Violations
    Intentional or reckless setting of fires without proper authority

      • In any University building or
      • On University property

    E.22 Explosives/Combustibles
    The unauthorized possession, use, misuse, storage, or distribution on campus of:

      • Any type of fireworks
      • Ammunition/gun powder
      • Fuses
      • Explosives/combustibles of any kind
      • Chemicals
      • Propane tanks

    E.23 Unauthorized Audio/Video/Photo
    Making audio, video, or photo recording of any person other than yourself without their prior knowledge and consent if a reasonable person would find that it would cause injury or distress to the subject of the recording.

    This includes:

      • Sending, distributing, uploading to the internet, or transmitting any audio, video, or photo without consent, even if the person gave consent for the recording, video, or photograph(s) to be made.
      • For example, images or sounds taken while the person was in a private or intimate space such as:
        • Locker room
        • Restroom or
        • Bedroom
      • A “reasonable person” is defined in Section C.

    E.24 Hazing
    In accordance with Iowa state law, hazing is defined as any intentional or reckless behavior, action or situation, occurring with or without consent that:

      • endangers or creates risk of injury,
      • creates mental or physical discomfort,
      • hinders student engagement,
      • harasses,
      • embarrasses and/or ridicules a person,

    This would include:

      • Assisting, or
      • Approving (implicitly or explicitly), or
      • Organizing, or
      • Or otherwise participating in

    For the purpose of:

      • initiation into, or
      • affiliation with, or
      • as a condition for continued membership or a leadership role in any student organization, fraternity, sorority, or team recognized by the University of Iowa Student Government or by any other University sponsor or department

 
  • Section F: Special Rules for Housing and Dining Facilities

    F.1 In the Presence of Alcohol 
    Being present in a residence hall space where consumption, possession, distribution, or sale of alcoholic beverages is prohibited.

    F.2 Empty Alcohol Containers
    The possession of empty alcohol containers is prohibited in the residence halls.

    F.3 In the Presence of Drugs
    Being present in a residence hall space where consumption, possession, distribution, or sale of drugs, narcotics, or other controlled substances or the possession of drug paraphernalia is prohibited.

    F.4 Quiet Hours and Courtesy Hours
    Residence Hall Quiet Hours are Sunday – Thursday 11:00 pm – 7:00 am and Friday – Saturday 1:00 am – 9:00 am. At the end of the semester, there will be postings to share the extended quiet hours and 24-hour quiet hours policies. When Quiet Hours are in effect no noise should be heard from another room or area. Courtesy Hours are always in effect, which means residents must comply with the requests of others to lessen or eliminate noise.

    F.5 Guest Policy
    Only students who have signed residence hall contracts are permitted to live in residence halls. Residents are responsible for the behavior of their guests. Guests who violate residence hall policies will be asked to leave the residence hall and their host will be held responsible for the policy violation. Residents may host overnight guests as long as they do not infringe on the rights of other residents. No guest may stay for more than three nights within a fourteen day period. A guest is defined as a person who does not hold a contract for the individual room or building where the policy violation takes place in.

    Residents are responsible for the behavior of their guests and should escort their guests at all times in residence hall spaces. Guests who violate residence hall policies will be asked to leave the residence hall and their host will be held responsible for the policy violation as if they violated the policy themselves. If the guest is a student at the University of Iowa, they will also go through the Student Accountability process. 

    F.6 Windows and Screens
    Screens are not to be unhooked or removed from windows for any reason. Residents of a room or building are responsible for any objects ejected from windows, fire escapes or roofs. Windows are not to be used for entrances or exits. Windows should remain closed during periods of high winds and/or heavy rains, times of cold temperatures, and any time instructions are sent to students by University Housing & Dining staff.

    F.7 Keys and Prox Cards
    Residence Hall keys and building access cards (student ID or temporary prox card issued by front desk) must remain in the possession of the resident of the room/building at all times. Residents should not loan their key, student ID, prox card to anyone else.

    All residence hall keys and prox cards must be returned when residents vacate their room. Residents will be responsible for the cost of replacing lost keys and prox cards, including if the temporary prox card is not returned by the deadline given at the time when it was issued to the resident.  If the misplaced key or card is found after a replacement has been issued the charge will not be refunded.

    F.8 Pets
    Pets are not permitted in the residence halls except for fish in tanks no larger than 5 gallons. Pets are prohibited from entering the buildings even on a “visiting” or “temporary” basis, including during residence hall move-in and move-out. Pets found in the residence halls will be subject to immediate removal and transfer to Iowa City Animal Control authorities if unable to move to an off-campus location within twenty-four hours. A resident who has been granted a medical accommodation for an emotional support animal (ESA) cannot bring the animal to another residence hall room.

    Residents bringing a service animal, or who may need an emotional support animal due to a medical accommodation, should contact Contracts and Assignments for additional information. This accommodation must be granted prior to bringing the animal into the hall.

    F.9 Electrical Appliances
    All appliances must be in good working order. Extension cords must be UL approved. Rooms are not wired to permit the use of any large electrical appliances including air conditioners or space heaters.

    F.10 Cooking Appliances 
    Appliances that have an exposed heating element, use cooking greases or have an open flame are prohibited. Only residents that have a contract for a residence hall room with a kitchen may use toaster ovens in the kitchen area.

    Residents should refer to https://housing.uiowa.edu/what-to-bring for a list of prohibited items.

    F.11 Refrigerators
    Only one refrigerator (personal or department issued) is allowed per single or double room/suite. Residents living in a room with a kitchen or a kitchenette where a refrigerator is provided, are prohibited from having additional refrigerator(s). Residents living with more than one other roommate (i.e. triple or quad) may have up to two mini refrigerators. Refrigerators brought by residents must be U.L. approved and may not exceed five cubic.

    Residents in need of an additional refrigerator due to a medical accommodation should contact Contracts and Assignments for additional information.

    F.12 Elevators
    Passenger elevators located within the residence halls are provided for use by residents of that building, their guests and departmental staff.  The following actions are prohibited: damage or vandalism of the elevators (including purposeful disruption, i.e. jumping), use of emergency alarms/stops in situations other than an emergency, unauthorized use of an elevator key, or giving elevator to someone else who would not otherwise have access.  

    F.13 Room and Door Decorations 
    Decorations may not obstruct doorways, corridors, stairways or any other means of exit. Decorations are prohibited from being attached or suspended from lighting fixtures, ceiling tile framework, pipes, or firefighting equipment including sprinkler piping or sprinkler heads. Decorations or furnishings permanently attached (i.e. drilled, screwed, or nailed) to the ceiling, walls, floor, door, or provided furniture are prohibited. 

      • Decorative Lights: Lights on metal trees or artificial decorations that are made of combustible materials are prohibited. Rooms must not be left unattended with holiday or decorative lights on.
      • Flammable and combustible materials (i.e. paper, posters, wrapping paper, ribbon, tinsel, post-it notes, etc.) on student room doors must be kept to a minimum (no more that 25% of the door may be covered). Resident may not write, drill or permanently damage room doors.

    F.14 Hall Sports
    Athletic events including using rollerblades, roller skates, or skateboards, and throwing or bouncing balls or athletic equipment are prohibited in the residence halls. Hall sports can also include activities such as running/racing, jousting, gymnastics, “rough housing”, etc.

    F.15 Improper Room Change and Use of Unoccupied Space
    Residents with unoccupied space in their room must keep one half of the room ready for a new roommate to move in at any time. Students wishing to change/transfer rooms must be approved by University Housing and Dining staff. Failure to complete all necessary paperwork before moving is prohibited.

    F.16 Room and Building Furnishings
    All furniture issued to a student room must stay in that room (i.e. chair, dresser, bulletin board, mattress, bed, trash can, recycling container, etc.). Equipment and furnishings in lounges, study areas, or any other general-purpose space of the residence halls may not be removed or transferred to individual student rooms.

      • Changing a bed configuration (including de-lofting) must be facilitated by appropriate University Housing & Dining staff by submitting a work order at the front desk for adjustment.
      • Water beds are prohibited.

    F.17 Commercial Activity/Business
    Residents are not permitted to utilize their room for any commercial purpose and for licensed and unlicensed businesses. Solicitation and posting of flyers without approval is not allowed in the residence halls.  

    F.18 Trash
    Students are responsible for disposing of their own trash and recycling in the designated areas within and around the residence halls, this includes not leaving trash next to smaller trash bins around the residence halls. Residents that have opted into the composting program must follow all requirements and bring materials to the designated areas.  

    F.19 Disruptive Event
    Individual or group activities within any area of the residence hall that cause a disturbance, obstruct or disrupt disciplinary procedures, University Housing procedures or events, or the residence hall community. 

    F.20 Possession of Candles and Incense
    Candles and incense (lit or unlit) are prohibited in the residence halls. 


Accountability Procedure (2021-2022 academic year)

Copied below is the 2021-22 academic year version of the Accountability Procedure, which rules are applicable to reports occurring on or after August 15, 2021.

For any incidents that occurred before August 15, 2021, please use the 2020-2021 Code of Student Life.

  • Section 1: Purpose

    The University of Iowa’s Student Accountability Procedure is designed to provide a process to investigate and resolve alleged violations of University policies by students. This procedure is intended to be an educational process and is not a substitute for the civil or criminal court system. Rather, the Student Accountability Procedure provides a mechanism for the University to determine if University rules have been violated and act in accordance with the findings.

    This procedure will provide all students:

    1. A summary of the allegations made against you and the corresponding policies you are alleged to have violated.
    2. The opportunity to have a support-person present with you, which may be an attorney provided at your own cost, if you wish.
    3. The opportunity to present your account to a neutral investigator who starts with the assumption that you are not responsible for the alleged behavior.
    4. The opportunity to review evidence used to make a decision.
    5. The understanding that decisions regarding your responsibility will be made by the preponderance of the evidence standard, also known as the “more likely than not” standard.
    6. The opportunity to appeal the final decision and the sanctions imposed, if applicable.

  • Section 2: Reports

    The following process shall apply to the Code of Student Life.

    The University may learn of possible misconduct from any person, law enforcement agency, or a unit/department of the University. The report will ordinarily be in writing but can be received verbally as well. Online reports may also be submitted anonymously through the Dean of Students reporting form. Reporting anonymously may, however, limit the University’s ability to respond.

    When a report is received:

    Upon receiving the report, the Office of Student Accountability will consider the nature of the incident or report, the evidence available, and the parties involved. After a report is received, the Office of Student Accountability may:

      • Make a determination that there is not sufficient evidence available to pursue an investigation (i.e. we cannot determine the identity of the allegedly responsible party);
      • Determine that the behavior alleged would not violate the Code of Student Life if it occurred as reported (i.e. protected speech/expression, or allegations of behavior that falls outside of the jurisdiction of the Office of Student Accountability);
      • Refer the matter to another University unit/department; or
      • Proceed with an investigation.

    Reports that involve any allegations of sexual misconduct, domestic or dating violence, stalking, harassment, bias, discrimination, equity or free speech will be forwarded to the Office of Institutional Equity (OIE).

    Most reports occurring in the University Residence Halls will be referred to and adjudicated by Residence Education. If a student violates policies, rules, or regulations within University of Iowa Housing and Dining facilities, they are generally subject to the procedures followed by University Housing and Dining. However, the Director of OSA has the discretion to retain the matter within the Office of Student Accountability.

    Reports involving alleged violations of other University policies (for example, the Human Rights Policy and the Anti-Harassment Policy) may be referred to the appropriate University office(s) for investigation and/or adjudication.

    Reports of most other misconduct will ordinarily be handled by the Office of Student Accountability (OSA).

    The Office of Student Accountability may impose sanctions on students under this procedure for violations of any university policy, even if the Office of Student Accountability did not investigate the allegation.

  • Section 3: Standard of Evidence

    The standard of evidence used for cases investigated using the Student Accountability Procedure is a “preponderance of the evidence.” If the investigator determines that it is more likely than not that no policy violation occurred, the report will be dismissed. If the investigator determines that it is more likely than not that one or more University policies were violated, a sanction or sanctions may be imposed.

  • Section 4: Interim Measures

    Pending the completion of an investigation and issuance of a report, a Responding Student may be subjected to any measure set forth in this Student Accountability Procedure, other than expulsion or restitution/fines, on an interim basis. The investigator or Director of Student Accountability will base an interim measure decision on evidence available at that time the interim measures are imposed. In cases where suspension is being considered as an interim measure, the investigator or Director of Student Accountability will consider whether the student’s continued presence at the University pending the outcome of the investigation creates a continuing danger to persons or property or constitutes an ongoing threat of disruption to the academic process.

    Within ten (10) University business days after an interim measure is imposed, a request may be made in writing to the Director of Student Accountability to review and reconsider the interim measures by following the procedures outlined in Subsection 7.

    In situations where an investigation will take an extended length of time, and when serious interim measures are imposed against a Responding Student (i.e., interim suspension, interim building ban, interim housing contract cancellation, or interim housing transfer), the interim measure(s) will be continuously reassessed by the investigators based on available information. A Responding Student may request that the investigator reconsider serious interim measures at any time.

    In circumstances where there is a Reporting Party for a case, the Director of Student Accountability will notify the Reporting Party of a Respondent’s request to reconsider or modify measures that directly impact the Reporting Party.

  • Section 5: Support Person(s)

    Any student participating in a meeting with the Office of Student Accountability may bring up to two (2) support individuals to a meeting. The support person provides emotional support to the party and helps clarify the process. A witness in the case is not eligible to serve as a support person. One of the support individuals may be an attorney or advocate, who may ask clarifying procedural questions of the investigator or Director, but otherwise, the support individual(s) may not speak during meetings with the investigator or Director.

  • Section 6: Investigation Procedure

    All investigations will begin when the Responding Student receives a written summary of the allegations made against them and a copy of the corresponding policies they are alleged to have violated. It is possible that the investigation may conclude during the initial meeting with an investigator. More complex matters may require the Responding Student to participate in multiple meetings with an investigator, as well as time for the investigator to review evidence and interview witnesses, as applicable. If suspension or expulsion is a possible outcome of a case due to the severity of the allegations, the student will be informed of the serious nature of the case in the letter initiating the investigation or a subsequent letter should the situation warrant it at a later date. During their meeting(s) with an investigator, all students will be provided the opportunities outlined above in subsection 1.

    Students who disagree with the jurisdictional reach as defined in the Code of Student Life, Section D, may mention their disagreement to the investigator during the investigation process. The investigator will provide and document their response to the concern raised by the student in the investigation report.  

    Following the first meeting with the investigator, students may request to be allowed to review and respond to all evidence that will be used to make a decision regarding the allegations. All such student requests will be granted and coordinated by the Office of Student Accountability. Depending on the nature of the information, some documents may need to be redacted as a matter of law (i.e., to protect personally identifiable information).

    Following an investigation through the Office of Student Accountability, the possible outcomes include:

      • A decision to dismiss the allegations. The matter is then closed and documentation in the Office of Student Accountability would reflect the allegations were dismissed.
      • A decision that it is more likely than not that the Responding Student violated student conduct policies. The investigator has the authority to impose sanctions, with the exception of suspension or expulsion cases as detailed in Subsection 9. If the investigator recommends suspension or expulsion as a possible outcome, the Director of the Office of Student Accountability has the authority to suspend or expel as detailed in Subsection 10.

  • Section 7: Interim Measure Appeals
     

    Within ten (10) University business days after receipt of the notice of the interim measure(s), a request may be made in writing to the Director of Student Accountability to review and reconsider the interim measures. A student may request an extension of the deadline by emailing the Office of Student Accountability at least two (2) University business days prior to the due date of the appeal.

    The appealing party must support the appeal by addressing one or more of the following grounds:

    1. There was significant procedural error sufficient to adversely affect the decision (e.g., lack of notice, opportunity to be heard, or opportunity to challenge information);
    2. The decision was not supported by substantial evidence when viewed as a whole or not appropriate in light of the allegation(s);
    3. The decision amounted to misapplication of the rules;
    4. New, substantial evidence, not reasonably available at the time the interim measure was imposed, could materially change the decision.

  • Section 8: Impact of Criminal Charges

    University investigations may be initiated against a student regarding behavior that potentially violates both criminal laws and University policy, even if a criminal investigation or court proceeding might be pending. The criminal and university processes are separate and distinct; therefore, each process can be resolved according to its own individual timeline. In this section, references to criminal court may include contempt hearings for violating a court order as well as violations of any federal, state, or local law or ordinance. The investigator or Director of Student Accountability may elect to delay the resolution of a report, in whole or part, if criminal charges are pending.

    If convicted in criminal court of behavior prohibited under the Code of Student Life, a student also will be charged with violating Section E.2 Criminal Conduct of the Code of Student Life and subject to disciplinary sanctions. For purposes of these procedures, a conviction includes a guilty plea, jury verdict, misconduct decision, or deferred judgment.

    Due to the differences between the standard of proof used by a criminal court and the preponderance of the evidence standard used in university misconduct investigations, a student charged but not convicted of a crime is still subject to the student accountability process and may be found responsible for a policy violation. Once a finding and sanctions are imposed under this Student Accountability Procedure they remain in place even though criminal charges arising out of the same facts were dismissed, reduced, expunged, or resolved in favor of the Responding Student.

  • Section 9: Impact of a Student Withdrawing

    As detailed in the Code of Student Life, Section D (Jurisdiction), withdrawal from the University, including failure to re-enroll in a subsequent semester, does not end jurisdiction under these rules for behavior that took place while the Responding Student was considered a student as defined by the Code of Student Life.

    If a student is not registered when a report is filed against them, the Director of OSA may:

      • Proceed with an investigation, or
      • Restrict future registration, delay investigation, and/or resolve the report at a later date when or if the student seeks to register in a university course or program.

  • Section 10: Investigator Resolution

    After considering the relevant evidence, when an investigator determines that it is more likely than not a policy violation occurred, the investigator has the authority to impose any disciplinary sanction other than suspension or expulsion. An explanation of potential sanctions can be found in Subsection 12.

    The investigator will inform the student of the decision in writing and will include a summary of the evidence considered, credibility assessments when necessary, how the evidence factored into the outcome of the case, the sanction imposed or recommended, and a rationale for each sanction imposed. In cases where there is a difference between the information provided by the Responding Student and evidence provided through other witnesses or means, the investigator will conduct a credibility analysis to determine the facts that will be used to analyze the policy.  

    The investigator’s decision and/or sanction imposed can be appealed through the process identified in Subsection 13.

  • Section 11: Suspension / Expulsion Case Resolution

    In cases where an investigator determines that it is more likely than not that a policy violation occurred and the most likely sanction for the behavior is suspension or expulsion, the Director of the Office of Student Accountability, or their designee, has the authority to suspend or expel the Responding Student.

    The investigator will complete an investigation report including a summary of the evidence considered, credibility assessments when necessary, how the evidence factored into the outcome of the case, and the rationale for possible suspension or expulsion. The investigator will send the investigation report to the Responding Student and coordinate a meeting between the Director of Student Accountability and the Responding Student.

    During the Responding Student’s meeting with the Director of Student Accountability, the student will have the opportunity to share their response to the investigation report and advocate for the sanction they believe is reasonable. Following the meeting, the Director of Student Accountability will issue a sanction decision, including the rationale for the sanction(s), an explanation of how the evidence supports the sanction(s), and why the sanction(s) was/were selected over any alternative sanction(s).

  • Section 12: Sanctions

    When it has been determined after an investigation that one or more University policies have been violated, one or more sanctions may be imposed.

    Sanctions will vary based upon the facts and circumstances of the specific violation(s). Sanctions are usually progressive in nature and include the probability of more serious sanctions if the student is found responsible for multiple violations of the Code of Student Life or other policies.

    Most alcohol offenses and possession of cannabis under ten (10) grams may be sanctioned through a disciplinary reprimand, appropriate educational sanction, notification to a parent if the student is a minor, and participation in the Critical MASS program (see minimum sanctions for alcohol and drug violations in the Policy Regarding Use of Illegal Drugs and Alcohol).

    Students who fail to comply with a sanction in a timely manner may be subject to additional disciplinary action, which may include a hold on the student’s ability to register for classes until compliance is achieved. The Director of Student Accountability has the authority to take such additional action in cases of non-compliance arising out of reports resolved by an investigator or another University department, such as University Housing & Dining.

    In the event that a student fails to comply with a sanction and the Director of Student Accountability has decided to bar registration, the student will be notified of the apparent failure to comply, the Director of Student Accountability’s intent to place a hold on their ability to register for classes, and provided an opportunity to meet personally with the Director of Student Accountability and explain the circumstances prior to a final decision being issued by the Director. A student whose registration is barred for failing to comply with a sanction may appeal the Director of Student Accountability’s decision through the process identified in Subsection 13.

    The following is a non-exhaustive list of potential sanctions that may be imposed individually or in combination:

    Status Sanctions: Sanctions that impact a student’s status with the university, ranging from a Disciplinary Reprimand to Expulsion.

    A. Disciplinary Reprimand: A written warning to the student explaining that the student's violation of university policy requires an official record to be kept in the Office of Student Accountability. A subsequent University policy violation following a Disciplinary Reprimand may result in the imposition of more serious sanctions. Students who have received a disciplinary reprimand may automatically have their sanction removed from their record. In order to be eligible to have the sanction removed, the student must meet the following criteria:

      • It has been at least 12 months since the behavior occurred.
      • The student has not been found responsible for any additional Code of Student or other policy violations, including any alcohol or drug related offenses, on or off campus in the past 12 months.
      • The student completed all sanctions required by the University and, if applicable, actions required by courts having jurisdiction over the matter.

    B. Disciplinary Probation: A written acknowledgement of a violation of university policy. The student may remain enrolled at the university only on the condition that the student complies with university policies including the Code of Student Life, and any other sanctions or restrictions on privileges, for a specified amount of time. Probation will typically last for the semester in which probation is imposed, plus two additional semesters, which will not include summer or winter terms. Probation duration will be based on the nature and circumstances of the incident(s), with less serious circumstances generally resulting in a shorter probation duration.

    Students with disciplinary probation status are not considered to be in good standing with respect to the non-academic disciplinary system for the designated period of time. Students who violate university policy during the probationary period may receive more serious disciplinary sanctions, including the possibility of suspension or.

    Once the designated probation period of time has elapsed, the student will again be considered in good standing. A record of the disciplinary probation sanction will be kept in the Office of Student Accountability in compliance with the university’s regular record retention schedule.

    Students who are placed on disciplinary probation may be ineligible for certain campus jobs, leadership positions, or other academic opportunities, such as study abroad.

    C. Disciplinary Suspension: Involuntarily separation from the University for a period of time after which readmission is possible. Conditions for return may be specified. The Director of Student Accountability may be required to approve any request for readmission.

    D. Expulsion: Permanent separation from the University and all other Board of Regents, State of Iowa, institutions.

    Restorative Sanctions: Sanctions that are intended to reestablish a student’s standing at the university. These sanctions are intended to be educational in nature and address the nature of the misconduct.

    E. Student Wellness Sanctions: Students found responsible for alcohol and other drug violations may be required to complete alcohol and/or drug education. This education could be facilitated by Student Wellness or another local agency in the community. The student is responsible for the cost of completing this requirement.

    F. Restitution and/or Fine: A student may be assessed reasonable expenses related to the misconduct. This may include, but is not limited to, the repair/replacement cost for any damage they caused to University property. In addition, University Housing & Dining may impose fines on students who are found responsible for violating alcohol or drug policies. In these instances, the fines are used to help pay for the student’s alcohol and/or drug education and for alcohol alternative events.

    G. Educational Sanctions: A student may be required to provide an identified service or participate in a particular program, receive specific instruction, or complete a research assignment. The student may be responsible for the cost of completing this requirement.

    Denial of Privileges: Sanctions that involve restricting a student’s involvement in a campus activity, academic course, or program as result of being found responsible for misconduct.

    H. No-Contact Directive: A student may be prohibited from contacting a student, employee, or visitor to campus in any manner at any time. Such prohibition may be in effect for a specific or an indefinite period of time, and may be imposed on an interim or final basis.

    I. University Housing Transfer or Contract Cancellation: A student may be involuntarily transferred within, between, or removed from, University housing or residence halls. The student may also be prohibited from entering any or all University housing or residence halls, including reapplying for future university housing accommodations. Conditions for readmission may be specified.

    J. Building Prohibition: A student may be prohibited from entering a specific building or set of buildings. This prohibition may be in effect for a specific or an indefinite amount of time and may be imposed on an interim or final basis.

    K. Campus Prohibition: A student may be prohibited from entering the University of Iowa campus. This prohibition may be in effect for a specific or indefinite amount of time, and typically is a component of suspension or expulsion sanctions.

  • Section 13: Appeal Procedure

    In all cases, a student may appeal the decision of an investigator and/or the sanction imposed. The appeal must be in writing and filed with the Office of Student Accountability within ten (10) University business days following notification of the investigation decision or sanction imposed, whichever is later. The appeal form can be found here.

    A student may request an extension of the appeal filing deadline by emailing the Office of Student Accountability at least two (2) University business days prior to the due date of the appeal and providing an explanation for the request.

    The appealing party must support the appeal by addressing one or more of the following grounds.

    1. There was significant procedural error that materially affected the outcome (e.g., lack of notice, opportunity to be heard, or opportunity to challenge information);
    2. The decision was not supported by substantial evidence when viewed as a whole;
    3. The decision amounted to misapplication of the rules;
    4. The sanction imposed was not appropriate in light of the policy violation(s);
    5. New, substantial evidence, not reasonably available at the time of the investigation or sanctioning, could materially change the decision.

    The Director of Student Accountability will send an acknowledgement of receipt of the appeal to the student, generally within two (2) University business days.

    The Director of Student Accountability will transmit the student’s appeal and the record to the appropriate University office within two (2) University business days.  Appeals of cases that involve suspension or expulsion are heard by the Office of the Provost. Appeals of all other cases (including deferred sanctions) are heard by the Office of the Vice President for Student Life. Sanctions imposed by the investigator or Director of Student Accountability will remain in effect while the appeal is being considered, unless otherwise noted.

    The appeal officer will review the student’s written appeal and the case record, which includes investigator notes and evidence collected. The appeal officer will not meet with the student or witnesses, or engage in further investigation with respect to the allegations.

    The appeal officer will transmit a written decision on the appeal to the Director of Student Accountability within ten (10) University business days from when the record was received by the appeal officer. The Director will circulate the decision on appeal within two (2) University business days after receipt of the decision.

    The decision made by the Office of the Provost or the Vice President for Student Life on appeal is the final university decision on the matter. The student may appeal the University’s final decision to the Board of Regents, State of Iowa, subject to its policies, procedures, and deadlines.  The University’s final decision letter will provide a hyper-link to the appeal procedures for the Board of Regents. Any sanctions imposed will remain in effect until the Board of Regents appeal process has been completed.

  • Section 14: Withdrawal of Enrollment, Transcript Notations and Registration Holds

    A Responding Student whose case could result in suspension or expulsion, either due to the severe nature of the allegations or a prior misconduct record, shall not withdraw their current enrollment without the permission of the Office of Student Accountability. Should a student withdraw without permission while an investigation is occurring that could result in suspension or expulsion, including failing to re-enroll for a subsequent academic semester, the Office of Student Accountability will place a notation on the student’s transcript stating “Withdrew After Disciplinary Complaint Was Filed.” The notation will remain on the student’s transcript until they elect to return to the University of Iowa and complete the process.

    When a student is suspended, the transcript notation will read: “Non-Academic Misconduct – Suspension from (semester) to (semester).”  The notation will remain on the student’s transcript until one of the following occurs: (1) the suspension is overturned on appeal; or (2) completion of the suspension period and, when appropriate, the Office of Student Accountability receives evidence that the student has met all requirements for other imposed sanctions.

    When a student is expelled, the transcript notation will read: “Non-Academic Misconduct – Expulsion.” The notation will remain on the student’s transcript unless the expulsion is overturned on appeal.

    The Office of Student Accountability may place a hold on a student’s ability to register if any of the following occurs:

      • The student fails to meet with an OSA staff member after receiving correspondence by email and a phone call or text reminder.
      • A report is received by OSA involving a student who is not currently registered, but is still considered a student as outlined in the Section D of the Code of Student Life.
      • A student fails to complete a sanction required by the Office of Student Accountability or University Housing & Dining.

    The Office of Student Accountability may place a hold on the conferral of a graduate or undergraduate degree until the student accountability process is completed and all sanctions, if applicable, have been satisfactorily completed, even if the student has satisfied all academic requirements for the degree.


Academic Misconduct

Undergraduate Colleges
As stated in Regulation 1 of the Code of Student Life (/policies/code-of-student- life/) General Conduct Regulations, violation of the regulations for academic misbehavior is ordinarily handled within the department or college concerned. The following procedure applies specifically to the colleges of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Education, Engineering, Nursing, Pharmacy, Public Health, University College, and Business. Students who wish more specific information should inquire at the office of their respective dean.

Reporting of Plagiarism and Cheating
All cases of academic misconduct, including but not limited to plagiarism and cheating, are reported for action to the designated person in the office of the dean of the college, through departmental channels, with a statement of the necessary facts. The department and the instructor concerned may also submit recommendations in each case for appropriate disciplinary action.

Disciplinary Action

  1. By the Instructor.
    The individual instructor may reduce the student's grade, including the assignment of the grade of "F" in the course. A report of this action should always be sent to the dean of the college.
  2. By the Dean.

    The dean of the college or a student-faculty committee appointed by them may impose the following or other penalties as the offense may warrant: completion of non-credit academic integrity program; disciplinary probation; suspension from the college; and expulsion.  If the student feels that the penalty imposed by the dean is unjust, the student may request an appeal by the Office of the Provost.

Referral to the Office of the Provost
In the cases of flagrant or repeated offenses or for other reasons deemed sufficient by the dean of the college, the case and records may be referred to the Office of the Provost for appropriate action.

Record of Disciplinary Action
The dean's office shall maintain a record of disciplinary cases and disposition thereof and shall notify other agencies of the University, as are concerned, with action taken in the case. The student involved shall be informed that a record is being kept of the offense.

Graduate Colleges
Questions of academic dishonesty arising within the colleges of Medicine, Law, Pharmacy, Dentistry, Public Health, and the Graduate College are treated on an individual basis.

In the Graduate College, the questions are handled at the departmental level. If the departmental decision is appealed, the dean may appoint an appeals committee of faculty and students from a slate of nominees prepared by the Graduate Council and the Graduate Student Senate to recommend an appropriate course of action. The Graduate College policy on plagiarism is posted in Section IV.F on the Manual at https://www.grad.uiowa.edu/manual-part-1-section-iv-academic-standing-probation-and-dismissal#1.4.F. 

Students in professional graduate colleges should inquire at the office of their respective dean for further information. If the student disagrees with the decision made by the Dean, the student may request an appeal by the Provost.

Disqualification from Academic Programs

As part of the college's academic standards program, professional colleges enforce ethical conduct codes for enrolled students. Students may obtain a copy of the college's current ethical rules and procedures by contacting the Dean of the college. In addition to suspending a student for unethical behavior, the college may contact the state professional licensing agency and decline to recommend the student for licensure.

Professional degree programs ordinarily include practicum requirements for graduation. As a pre-requisite for enrollment in a practicum, students admitted to a professional program may be required to successfully complete a training or orientation course, a health screening, and a criminal background check or meet other criteria required by practicum worksite policy.

A student admitted to an academic program who is disqualified from the program by the department may ask the Dean to review the department's decision. If the student disagrees with the decision made by the Dean, the student may request an appeal by the Provost.


Policy Regarding the Use of Illegal Drugs and Alcohol

The Health Risks Associated with the Use of Illegal Drugs and Alcohol

Student use of cannabis, LSD, amphetamines, sedatives, tranquilizers, stimulants, synthetic drugs, or other drugs or controlled substances (as defined by law) is a matter of concern to this educational institution. The University is also concerned about student abuse of alcohol, prescription medications, and inhalants.

Succeeding at the University requires a balanced, healthy lifestyle. Misuse of alcohol and the use of other drugs can interfere with or prolong a student’s academic career as well as cause legal, social, financial, and health problems. Alcohol and other drug-related accidents are a leading cause of death of people age 18-24 years old. As an educational institution, the University endeavors to protect and assist students by providing reliable information about the hazards of illegal drugs and alcohol. For more information on institutional efforts to decrease high-risk alcohol use among students, refer to the UI’s Alcohol Harm Reduction Plan.

Health risks include, but are not limited to, adverse modification of one or more body systems, such as the nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, muscular, endocrine, and central nervous systems; toxic, allergic, or other serious reaction; unfavorable mood alteration, and addiction. Physiological and psychological dependency, which manifests itself in a preoccupation with acquiring and using one or more drugs, may cause severe emotional and physical injury.

Alcohol use causes a number of marked changes in behavior. Even small amounts significantly impair the judgment and coordination required to drive a car safely, increasing the likelihood that the driver will be involved in an accident or face criminal consequences. Moderate to high doses of alcohol cause marked impairments in higher mental functions, severely altering a person’s ability to learn and remember information. Very high doses cause respiratory depression and death. If combined with other depressants of the central nervous system, much lower doses of alcohol will produce the effects just described.

Common side-effects of alcohol use include digestive complaints, sleep problems and adverse affects on a student’s academic performance. Because alcohol may increase aggression, excessive use may lead to fighting, vandalism, criminal mischief, and verbal abuse. Alcohol use often plays a role in sexual violence. University of Iowa students who use excessive amounts of alcohol have reported suffering from hangovers, missing class and/or work, and engaging in high-risk sexual behavior.

Repeated use of alcohol can lead to dependence. Sudden cessation of alcohol intake is likely to produce withdrawal symptoms, including severe anxiety, tremors, hallucinations, and convulsions. Alcohol withdrawal can be life-threatening. Long-term use of large quantities of alcohol, particularly when combined with poor nutrition, can also lead to permanent damage to vital organs such as the brain and the liver.

The health risks associated with specific narcotics, depressants, stimulants, hallucinogens, and cannabis  are explained in Table A.

Alcohol and Other Drug Education Services Available to Students

The University of Iowa offers a range of services for persons who want to learn more about alcohol and other drugs, are concerned about their own or someone else’s substance abuse, or are recovering from substance abuse problems. More specific information about drugs and drug abuse is available through Student Wellness and the University Counseling Service. Any discussions between individuals and the professional staffs in these offices are treated as confidential information.

To assist students whose substance-related behavior may be causing legal, academic, psychological, physical, or social problems, or jeopardizing their student status, the University maintains Alcohol and Drug Support, a component of Student Wellness. Services include substance abuse assessment and referral, outreach, education, and BASICS counseling. Students with concerns or questions are encouraged to contact Student Wellness at 319-335-8394 and talk with a counselor or Behavioral Health Consultant.

Alcoholic Beverages

Alcoholic beverages may not be consumed, possessed, distributed, or sold on campus without specific authorization. Student use of alcoholic beverages is prohibited on campus except as follows:

Students who are 21 years of age may purchase and consume alcoholic beverages in the Iowa Memorial Union or within other restricted areas of campus described in the Alcohol Beverage Service Guidelines in the University of Iowa Operations Manual V.26.

A college or department may serve alcoholic beverages on campus only in accordance with the Alcohol Beverage Service Guidelines and with the permission of the Office of the Vice President for Student Life (“Office of the Vice President”). 

Alcoholic beverages may not be purchased or served at events sponsored by a registered student organization or student government body, except in accordance with the Alcohol Beverage Service Guidelines, or with special permission from the Office of the Vice President. The scope of the prohibition includes student organization events which take place off campus as well as on-campus events. Alcoholic beverages cannot be purchased with mandatory student fees or with registered student organization funds.

For purposes of this policy, any event held on property owned or controlled by a registered student organization is considered to be an event sponsored by the organization. Registered student organizations which own, lease, or otherwise control private property are responsible for ensuring that federal, state and local laws are observed at all times on their property.  A fraternity or sorority chapter-sponsored event held at a third-party venue with a liquor license must conform to any rules established by the relevant governing body (Interfraternity Council, Multicultural Greek Council, National Pan-Hellenic Council, or Panhellenic Council).

Illegal Drugs other than Alcohol

Students may not consume, possess, distribute, or sell illegal drugs on campus.  The list of prohibited activity includes but is not limited to medications legally prescribed to one individual which are consumed by another individual without explicit permission from the health care provider who prescribed the medication.  The unauthorized use of prescription drugs -- consuming, possessing, distributing, or selling – is prohibited.  University policy also prohibits possession of drug paraphernalia.

In University Housing, restrictions on alcohol and illegal drug use, possession, sale and distribution are set forth in the Code of Student Life. Sanctions for violations which occur outside of University Housing are set forth below.

Disciplinary Action

The University will not tolerate the use of drugs that are illegal or consumed in an illegal manner. Students are expected to abide by the laws concerning controlled substances and alcoholic beverages. Students in violation of state or federal laws may face criminal prosecution, and the University will discipline students who possess or consume illegal drugs or alcohol on campus, off campus in violation of the law, or as a part of any other unauthorized University activity. (see Accountability Procedure.)

Sanctions which may be imposed for possession or use of alcohol and other drugs in violation of the Code of Student Life include a disciplinary reprimand, disciplinary probation, mandatory substance abuse evaluation, suspension, or expulsion. Registered student organizations which fail to comply with University regulations governing alcohol and other drugs may be disciplined by the Director of Student Accountability or by an appropriate governing body. The Director of Student Accountability may suspend an organization’s University recognition.

Illegal drug trafficking, including the sale, manufacture, distribution, or administration of illegal drugs, is viewed as a clear and present danger to the University community. Any student found to have sold, manufactured, distributed, or administered illegal drugs may be suspended or expelled. Students who violate the rights of others while under the influence of alcohol or drugs face serious disciplinary action up to and including suspension or expulsion.

Students found to have violated this policy or who harm themselves or others while under the influence of illegal drugs or alcohol will be required to undergo a substance abuse evaluation and attend all education or treatment programs recommended as a result of the evaluation in order to re-enroll.  The University may require a student recommended for inpatient treatment to enter a treatment program immediately in lieu of attending classes until the treatment is completed.

Reporting Alcohol or Drug Violations

Reports of illegal drug or alcohol use on campus should be directed to the Department of Public Safety. Violations that occur off campus typically are investigated by the law enforcement agency in the jurisdiction in which the alleged illegal activity occurred. In the residence halls, residence hall staff members will investigate reports of drug or alcohol use and may report to the Department of Public Safety. The Department of Public Safety, the Office of Student Accountability, and University Housing publish a summary of alcohol- and drug-related complaints in their periodic reports.

Applicable Legal Sanctions for Illegal Drugs

Both state and federal laws prohibit distribution of, manufacture of, or possession with intent to distribute a controlled substance or a counterfeit controlled substance. State penalties range from 6 months to life confinement and a fine of $430 to $1,000,000 depending upon the type and quantity of drug involved. Conviction may also result in the loss of state and federal benefits, such as grants, school loans, or work assistance, during the time periods required by federal law. Specific drugs, amounts, and penalties are described in Iowa Code § 124 and summarized in Table C.

Maximum federal penalties range from 1-year confinement to life imprisonment and a fine of $250,000 to $4,000,000, depending upon the type and quantity of drug involved. Specific drugs, amounts, and penalties are described in Table B. State and federal legal sanctions are subject to change by the General Assembly and Congress, respectively.

Illegal Drug Penalty Enhancement

The maximum term and fine increase significantly if state or federal penalty enhancement rules apply. Factors which raise maximum penalties under Federal penalty enhancement rules include death or serious bodily injury; prior drug conviction; placing at risk or distributing a drug to a person under 21 years old; using a person under 18 years of age to assist in the drug violation; and distributing or manufacturing a drug within 1,000 feet of school property, including the University of Iowa campus. Penalty enhancement rules apply to defendants age 18 years or older. Factors which raise maximum penalties under state penalty enhancement rules include using firearms or dangerous weapons in the commission of the offense; distributing or possessing with intent to distribute within 1,000 feet of school, public pool, or recreation center.

Possession of Illegal Drugs

Both state and federal laws prohibit possession of a controlled substance. The maximum state and federal penalty for possession is confinement for 1 year and a fine of $1,500. The maximum term and fine increase significantly in the event that state or federal penalty enhancement rules apply. A person in possession of a small amount of a controlled substance for personal use may be assessed a civil fine up to $10,000 in addition to any criminal fine. Under state law, repeat offenders may face fines up to $10,245 and confinement up to five years.

Driving While Intoxicated

Under state law, a person found guilty of operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of drugs or alcohol, or of having an alcohol concentration of .08% or higher, or of having any amount of a controlled substance in the person's blood or urine, shall be imprisoned for not less than 48 hours and fined not less than $1,250 for the first offense. For the second OWI offense the minimum period of confinement is 7 days and a fine of not less than $1,875 and up to $6,250. The minimum period of confinement for the third or subsequent OWI conviction is 30 days, and could be up to 5 years, with a fine of not less than $3,125 and up to $9,375.

If a person under 21 years of age is operating a motor vehicle with an alcohol concentration of .02% or greater, the person's driver's license will be revoked for at least 60 days, even if the person is not legally intoxicated. If a person is operating while intoxicated, the person's driver's license will be revoked for at least 180 days.

Alcohol-Related Offenses

The drinking age in Iowa is 21. State law prohibits:

  1. Purchase, attempt to purchase, possession, or use of alcohol under the drinking age;
  2. Giving or selling alcohol to a person under the drinking age;
  3. Driving a motor vehicle with an open container of alcohol in the passenger compartment;
  4. Giving or selling alcohol to an intoxicated person; and
  5. Public intoxication.

The City of Iowa City prohibits:

  1. The use of alcoholic beverages in a public place;
  2. Possession of an unsealed receptacle containing an alcoholic beverage in a public place.

Each of these offenses is a simple misdemeanor, punishable by a fine of $65 to $625 and a jail sentence of up to 30 days. For certain offenses, State law provides for mandatory fines and suspension of drivers licenses. For example, the mandatory fine for under-age possession of alcohol is $260 for a first offense and $500 for a second offense. A person over the legal age who gives, sells, or furnishes an alcoholic beverage to a person under the legal age commits a serious misdemeanor and is subject to a fine of between $500 and $2,560 and in addition may be sentenced to jail for up to 1 year. If injury results from the furnishing of alcohol, an aggravated misdemeanor is committed and the guilty person is subject to a fine of between $855 and $8,5400 and in addition may be sentenced up to 2 years in prison. If death results from the furnishing of alcohol, a class D felony is committed and a guilty person may be sentenced to a prison term not to exceed 5 years and be subject to a fine between $1,025 and $10,245.

 


Responsible Action Protocol

The Responsible Action Protocol

A student who seeks emergency assistance for themselves or on behalf of a student experiencing an alcohol or other drug related emergency will not be subject to disciplinary measures including, removal from a course, enrollment restrictions in a course or program, disciplinary reprimand, disciplinary probation, suspension, expulsion, or contract cancellation from University Housing & Dining under the Code of Student Life. However, the Office of Student Accountability may require completion of alcohol and/or other drug education/counseling. The Office of Student Accountability may also notify the student's parents of the alcohol or drug violation.

Scope of Protocol

1. The Responsible Action Protocol applies to students who seek and obtain emergency assistance on their own behalf or on the behalf of another student for a medical emergency related to use of drugs and/or alcohol. When a student does the following, the caller may not be subject to disciplinary action for violating University alcohol and/or drug rules.

The student must:

    • Be the first person to seek medical assistance, before a university staff member, law enforcement officer, or emergency medical personnel.
    • Provide their name and contact information to law enforcement and/or medical personnel.
    • Stay until assistance arrives or is provided.
    • Cooperate with medical personnel or law enforcement.

2. An "emergency" communication is a timely contact with 911 or University Housing & Dining staff when those staff members are not yet aware of the situation. The Responsible Action Protocol does not apply to individuals who telephone friends for assistance, for example, or who experience an alcohol or drug-related emergency that is first discovered by University employees or public safety officials.

3. In most cases, neither the student requiring emergency assistance nor an individual or group who assists will be subject to punitive University disciplinary action. Students who repeatedly violate the Code of Student Life in regard to alcohol and other drugs may be required to complete alcohol education in order to remain in good disciplinary standing.

4. In some instances, the Responsible Action Protocol may not apply to the caller if they purchased, supplied, or otherwise made available the alcohol or drugs contributing to the student needing medical assistance. Such instances will be examined on a case-by-case basis and will take into account the severity and the degree of responsibility for the circumstances.

5. If a representative of an organization hosting a registered event calls for medical assistance, this act of responsibility may mitigate potential disciplinary consequences that could arise against the organization (i.e., the fact that an organization representative sought help may be considered in potential sanctioning of the organization for policy violations).

6. The protocol applies to the Code of Student Life as well as certain situations involving people under the age of 21, including those receiving citations for the Possession of Alcohol Under the Legal Age, Possession of a Fake ID, as well as arrests for Public Intoxication. See information pertaining to the Iowa Medical Amnesty Bill for more information regarding law enforcement agencies and similar protocols which provide individuals immunity from charges and/or prosecution under the law.

7. The Responsible Action Protocol applies only to alcohol and other drug-related medical emergencies. It does not apply to other prohibited behavior such as disorderly conduct (including physical or verbal abuse), property damage, or distribution of controlled substances.

8. When a Reporting Party, Responding Student, third-party reporter, or witness to an incident of sexual misconduct participates in a good faith report, the Office of Student Accountability will not pursue disciplinary violations related to the impermissible drug or alcohol use against any of the involved student(s). To encourage reporting and participation in the process, University of Iowa maintains a policy of offering parties and witnesses amnesty from minor policy violations – such as underage use of alcohol or the use of controlled substances – related to the incident.

A student who is under the influence of alcohol or drugs at the time of a sexual misconduct incident should not be reluctant to seek assistance for that reason. In addition, law enforcement authorities in Johnson County have a policy of not pursuing charges for improper use of alcohol against a victim of sexual assault.

Requirements of Protocol

Students considered for the Responsible Action Protocol are required to meet with a staff member from the Office of Student Accountability or University Housing & Dining following the incident. When one student seeks emergency assistance on behalf of another student, both students may be required to meet with the staff member. After evaluating the situation, the staff member may refer either or both students to a behavioral health consultant for assessment, education, and/or possible referral for treatment. Students who are referred for substance abuse counseling, education, or treatment, but fail to complete the program requirements, will be subject to disciplinary action.

Even if disciplinary action is not taken, the Office of Student Accountability reserves the right to notify the student's parents, per standard practice. In accordance with the Discipline Records Management protocol, a case file will be maintained for reference should subsequent alcohol or other drug violations occur. In those subsequent cases, staff members will take into account the previous emergency incident when considering sanctions.


Minimum Sanctions for Violations of the University Alcohol and Drug Policies

Because of the threat to the health and safety of our students, the University has established mandatory minimum sanctions for alcohol and drug violations.

Alcohol and drug violations, both on and off-campus, include but are not limited to the following:

Alcohol

  • Possession of alcohol under the legal age (PAULA)
  • Public intoxication
  • Manufacture, use, or possession of false identification
  • Alcohol overdose
  • Operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated (OWI)
  • Involvement in a crime while under the influence of alcohol
  • Possession or use of alcoholic beverages in University Residence Halls, fraternity houses, or sorority houses
  • Possession or use of alcoholic beverages on University property outdoors or in other public areas of campus

Drugs

  • Possession of a controlled substance
  • Possession of drug paraphernalia
  • Driving under the influence of drugs
  • Drug trafficking
  • Involvement in a crime while under the influence of drugs

Sanctions

Sanctions usually begin with a disciplinary reprimand and are progressive in nature. However, the nature and type of violation or circumstances may result in more severe or lenient sanctions.

Disciplinary Reprimand

  • Parent/Guardian notification, if the student is under 21.
  • Satisfactory completion of a defined alcohol education program.
  • Assignment to meet with Critical MASS advisor.

Disciplinary Probation

  • Parent/Guardian notification letter and/or follow-up telephone call, if the student is under 21.
  • Satisfactory completion of a recommended alcohol or drug counseling program.
  • Disciplinary Probation for remainder of current semester and the following two semesters (Fall or Spring) enrolled at the University. Probation extends through any intervening summer terms, inter-sessions, and/or any institutional breaks.
  • Ordinarily, cancellation of a student's Housing contract if the student lives in a residence hall.

Suspension

  • Suspension from the University for at least one complete Fall or Spring semester following the suspension's effective date, including any intervening summer terms or inter-sessions. The Director of Student Accountability may elect for the suspension to take effect immediately or to take effect upon completion of the current semester or term.

Removal and Deferral of Sanctions

Student disciplinary records are maintained in the Office of Student Accountability. Students who have received a disciplinary reprimand may automatically have their disciplinary reprimand removed from their record. In order to be eligible to have the sanction removed, the student must meet the following criteria:

  • It has been at least 12 months since the disposition of the offense by the University.
  • The student has not received any additional Code of Student Life charges or any alcohol or drug related offenses on or off campus in the past 12 months.
  • The student completed all sanctions required by the University and, if applicable, the courts having jurisdiction over the matter.

Removal of a disciplinary reprimand from a student record is at the sole discretion of the Director of the Office of Student Accountability. Additionally, the opportunity for a student to have disciplinary reprimand removed does not apply to violations that may have resulted in a sanction more severe than a disciplinary reprimand (such as disciplinary probation, suspension, or expulsion).

At the discretion of the Director of the Office of Student Accountability, a student receiving a citation for being in the bars after 10 pm may receive a policy reminder letter. A policy reminder letter will not be considered an "offense" and will not be maintained as a disciplinary record. Contact the Office of Student Accountability at 319-335-1527 for more information.


Uniform Rules of Personal Conduct at Universities Under the Jurisdiction of the State Board of Regent

In lieu of using the regulations and procedures stated in the Code of Student Life and the Student Misconduct Procedure, the Vice President for Student Life has the option to invoke the rules and regulations prescribed by the Board of Regents and amended in November, 1973. The Regents Uniform Rules of Personal Conduct include a provision authorizing the president to declare a state of emergency and to impose sanctions during the emergency. The rules are printed in Section 681 of the Iowa Administrative Code, part 9.

Regents Policies on Campus Integrity

Political Action. No state university shall be or become an instrument of political action. The expression of political opinions and viewpoints will be those of individuals and not of institutions, since the official adoption of any political position, whether favored by majority or minority, tends to substitute one-sided commitment for the continuing search for truth.

Calendar Changes. Major proposed changes of the university calendar and the consequences of such changes will be brought with recommendations to the Board of Regents for final decision.


Judicial Procedure for Alleged Violations of the Regents’ Rules of Personal Conduct

Violations of the Uniform Rules of Personal Conduct at universities under the jurisdiction of the State Board of Regents will be adjudicated in accordance with the Hearing Regulations for Alleged Violations of Regents’ rules adopted by the Board of Regents on May 11, 1973, see section II-29, University Operations Manual.


Legal Assistance for Students

Student Legal Services (SLS) provides free legal advice and low-cost representation to currently registered University of Iowa students. SLS is staffed by two full-time attorneys, an office manager, and legal interns from the University of Iowa College of Law. Services are confidential.

SLS advises students on a variety of legal matters including, but not limited to, landlord-tenant disputes, criminal charges, immigration, small claims, and dissolution of marriage.

SLS is unable to advise students on business formation, money-making ventures, and in matters where two students are in conflict, but can provide referrals.

The SLS office is located in the Iowa Memorial Union and is open year-round. For more information or to schedule an appointment, visit https://legal.studentlife.uiowa.edu/ or call (319) 335-3276.


Use of Campus Outdoor Areas

Please see https://opsmanual.uiowa.edu/administrative-financial-and-facilities-policies/use-campus-outdoor-areas-other-pentacrest


Campus Policy on Violence

Please see http://opsmanual.uiowa.edu/community-policies/violence


Policy on Acceptable Use of Information Technology Resources

Please see http://opsmanual.uiowa.edu/community-policies/acceptable-use-information-technology-resources


Frequently Asked Questions about Code of Student Life

For students who received a notice of investigation letter from an investigator. 

I received a letter from the Office of Student Accountability and it sounds serious, is it?

Yes, the letter is serious. The Office of Student Accountability received a report that you allegedly engaged in behavior that may be a violation of the Code of Student Life or other University policy.

Is the outcome of my meeting pre-determined?

No. The investigator will make a decision whether you are responsible or not responsible for violating the Code of Student Life or other policy(ies) only after hearing your account of what happened.

What information will the investigator seek?

The investigator seeks details and circumstances about the incident in question.

Are sanctions pre-determined?

Depending upon the findings of the investigator, a pre-determined sanction may be imposed based on the violation(s). The sanctions imposed for violations depend upon the student’s prior disciplinary history and the nature of the violation. The potential sanctions that may be imposed are outlined in section 12 of the Accountability Procedure.

What if I have a scheduling conflict with the meeting time set by the investigator?

If you have a scheduling conflict, call the Office of Student Accountability (335-1527) as soon as possible to reschedule. If you do not call your registration may be restricted, or the investigator may proceed to make a decision in the case in your absence.

What rights do I have during the meeting with the investigator?

You have the right to:

a. A summary of the allegations made against you and the corresponding policies you are alleged to have violated.
b. The opportunity to have a support-person present with you, which may be an attorney provided at your own cost, if you wish.
c. The opportunity to present your account to a neutral investigator who starts with the assumption that you are not responsible for the alleged behavior.
d. The opportunity to review evidence used to make a decision.
e. The understanding that decisions regarding your responsibility will be made by the “preponderance of the evidence” standard, also known as the “more likely than not” standard.
f. The opportunity to appeal the final decision and the sanctions imposed, if applicable.

Should I read the Code of Student Life before the meeting?

We recommend that you read the Code of Student Life. You can refer to your notice of investigation letter for the rule(s) that you allegedly violated. We also recommend you read the Accountability Procedure.

Who is the investigator?

Generally, the investigator is a staff member in the Office of Student Accountability. The investigator’s role is described in the Accountability Procedure. The investigator is authorized to (1) make findings of fact, (2) determine whether the Code of Student Life policies apply to your case, and (3) impose non-suspension sanctions if you violated a misconduct rule.

What if I have questions about the accountability process in advance of the meeting?

If you have basic procedural questions, you can contact your investigator (listed in your notice of investigator letter) at 335-1527.

What if I don’t attend the meeting? Can I admit responsibility and resolve the case without meeting with anyone?

No, we expect you to attend the meeting even if you are not disputing the charges. If you do not attend, your registration may be restricted and the investigator may decide to issue a decision and impose sanctions without your participation.

Can my lawyer or parents attend the meeting?

Yes, as long as you are present and give them permission to attend. You are responsible for any legal expenses. As a courtesy, please inform the investigator in advance of your meeting who will attend the meeting with you. During the meeting, the investigator may ask you to sign an information release form so that they can discuss your case after the meeting with your attorney and/or support person(s).

Do I have a right to read the document that describes my alleged misconduct?

Yes. During your meeting, the investigator will share with you the report(s). The report is placed in your non-academic misconduct file and you have the right to view all the documents in your file.

What if the description of the incident in the report is inaccurate? How do I dispute the allegations?

If you believe the description of events is inaccurate, explaining your account of what happened during the meeting is important. As explained in the Accountability Procedure, you have the right to submit documents and other relevant evidence, and to identify witnesses who may have information relevant to the allegations. You also have a right to bring a support person (e.g., attorney, parent, advocate) to the meeting, at your own expense.

The investigator will determine if you did or did not violate the Code of Student Life. Following your meeting, the investigator will work to complete the investigation and notify you in writing of the outcome.  If the allegations are unfounded, the case will be dismissed and no sanctions will be imposed.

Why do I have to meet with the University when I’m resolving the issue in the court system?

Court charge(s) and the Code of Student Life charge(s) are separate and distinct matters, even though they arose out of the same circumstance(s). The court system will work to resolve any criminal or civil violation(s) of the law. However, because you are also a student, you are separately responsible for complying with the Code of Student Life and university policy, which are administrative in nature.

What happens if I pleaded guilty in court to a criminal charge filed by police in connection with this same incident?

A student who pleads guilty in court may be considered responsible for violating the Code of Student Life or university policy and therefore subject to disciplinary sanctions. For more information, refer to section 8, “Impact of Criminal Charges,” in the Accountability Procedure.

What if my criminal charge is still pending in court and there is a trial date set?

The Code of Student Life and university policies are different than criminal laws and procedures. You are still required to contact the university investigator, even if the criminal charge is not resolved in court. After they talk with you, the investigator may decide to delay the resolution of your Code of Student Life investigation because criminal charges are pending. For more information, refer to section 8, “Impact of Criminal Charges,” in the Accountability Procedure.

Is there someone who could help me prepare for my meeting with the investigator?

Yes, there are several resources are available, including the Accountability Procedure, the University Ombudsperson, or a private attorney may be an option (you are personally responsible for paying any fees for attorney services). If criminal charges are pending, it is strongly recommended that you consult with an attorney prior to your meeting with the investigator.

Will the process be over once I meet with the investigator?

That depends. There are several directions that your case may follow
a. The investigator may conclude the investigation with the following outcomes:

  • You are responsible for violating University Policy(ies) and sanction(s) are imposed. You must complete the sanction(s) before the case is closed. You may appeal the outcome to the Vice President for Student Life or to the Office of the Provost, depending on the sanction(s) you receive.
  • You are not responsible for violating University Policy(ies) and no sanctions are imposed.

b. The investigator may not conclude their investigation after one meeting if additional information is needed to make a decision. The investigator may postpone their decision until additional information is gathered and you may have a second meeting. The process is not complete until a final decision is issued from the investigator, even then, you have the right to appeal the investigator’s decision

For a visual representation of the Accountability Procedure, please see the University of Iowa Accountability Procedure Flowchart.

What if I do not like the decision made by the investigator after our meeting?

When an investigator finds you have violated the Code of Student Life, you have the opportunity to appeal the outcome by submitting a statement requesting the Vice President for Student Life (for non-suspension or expulsion sanctions) or the Office of the Provost (for suspension or expulsion sanctions) to review the decision. Ordinarily, no meeting occurs during the appeal process; the Vice President for Student Life or the Office of the Provost will review the record and read the appeal petition you submit before issuing a final decision letter. For more information about the appeal process, refer to section 13 of the Accountability Procedure.

What are the chances I will be suspended from the University?

Decisions to suspend a student are made by the Director of Student Accountability and not by an investigator. Even if you are not currently at risk of suspension, the outcome of your meeting with the investigator may have important consequences that could result in a suspension in the future. The investigator does have authority to impose serious sanctions short of suspension (such as a University Housing contract cancellation, disciplinary probation, or the completion of alcohol or drug education). Furthermore, a student placed on disciplinary probation may be subject to suspension if a subsequent violation were to occur..

Who has access to my disciplinary record?

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) severely restricts disclosures of non-directory information. In other words, if the information is not in the University’s directory, then it is not public information.

However, University employees with a legitimate educational interest (e.g., a dean or residence hall coordinator) may review your record without your written permission. In addition, where health and safety emergencies exist, or when required by law, the University may release information without your permission.

If I am found responsible for violating University policy, what will appear on my transcripts?

If you are found responsible for violating a University policy warranting less than a suspension or expulsion sanction, there will not be a notation on your transcript. If a student is found responsible for violating a University policy that warrants suspension or expulsion then a notation is placed on the transcript reflecting the suspension or expulsion. Additionally, students who withdraw from the University while an investigation is occurring that could result in suspension or expulsion, or if a student fails to re-enroll for a subsequent academic semester, they will receive a notation on their transcript indicating that they “Withdrew After Disciplinary Complaint Was Filed”

I am also facing the legal process through the courts. Isn’t this double jeopardy?

No. The term double jeopardy applies only to the criminal justice system and prohibits the government from prosecuting a citizen multiple times for the same violation of law. The student accountability process is designed to enforce University policies and review a student’s status at the University.

What happens if I withdraw from school, graduate or transfer to another institution before this is resolved?

A restriction may be placed on your ability to register for future classes or programs. Your student record may indicate that you withdrew after the disciplinary complaint was filed and permission from the Office of Student Accountability may be required before a withdrawn student may be permitted to re-enroll.


Flowchart for the Accountability Procedure

Please see https://dos.uiowa.edu/assets/Accountability-Procedure-Flowchart-FINAL.pdf


Registration of Student Organizations

A student organization is a voluntary special interest group organized for educational, social, recreational, and service purposes and comprised of its members. Student organizations are separate legal entities from the University of Iowa and legally are not treated the same as University departments or units. Student organizations can exist whether or not the University endorses them pursuant to this policy. Unless otherwise denoted hereafter, the use of the term “student organization” shall include sports clubs registered by Recreational Services.

Student organizations are an important link in the co-curricular activities of the University of Iowa. They play an important role in developing student leadership and providing a quality campus environment. As such, the University encourages the formation of student organizations around the areas of interests of its students, within the limits necessary to accommodate academic needs and ensure public safety.

I. Registration of Student Organizations

The University of Iowa, through the Vice President for Student Life (hereinafter, "vice president"), has delegated the responsibilities and obligations of registering student organizations to the Student Organization Review Committee (i.e., on behalf of the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership and Recreational Services) (SORC) and to deans of academic colleges. The SORC is a team of students and staff that determines the approval or denial of the application for registration. Registration of a student organization by the University does not constitute an endorsement of its program or its purposes, but is merely a charter to exist.

Organizations must abide by all local, state, and federal laws. An organization’s goals, objectives, and activities must not deviate from established University policies and procedures. Because participation in student organizations may enhance a student’s educational experience and the University deems this important to our students’ success, registered organizations are entitled to certain privileges and benefits.

The University shall not deny benefits or privileges available to student organizations based on the viewpoint of a student organization or the expression of the viewpoint by the student organization or its members, as protected by the First Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. In addition, the University shall not deny any benefit or privilege to a student organization based on the student organization's requirement that the leaders of the student organization agree to and support its beliefs, as those beliefs are interpreted and applied by the student organization, and to further its mission.

  1. Benefits of Registration:
    1. Registration as a University organization;
    2. Establishment of an account in the Student Organization Business Office (SOBO), Fraternity Business Service, or Recreational Services and appropriate purchasing privileges in accordance with University policies;
    3. Eligibility to apply for funds from mandatory Student Activity fees (i.e., for student organizations) or Recreational Services fees (i.e., for sports clubs);
    4. Inclusion in appropriate University publications;
    5. Utilization of the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership’s (CSIL) OrgSync software (funded by UISG & GPSG)
    6. Utilization of the University’s trademarks in accordance with the UI Trademark Licensing Department’s program and policies;
    7. Eligibility for use of campus meeting facilities and outdoor spaces;
    8. Eligibility, but not the right, to utilize UI Fleet Services vehicles in accordance with state and University policies, procedures, guidelines, and insurance requirements;
    9. Eligibility, but not the right, to utilize University staff and programming resources;
    10. Eligibility, but not the right, to utilize Information Technology Services Mass Mail once each semester;
    11. Eligibility to apply for awards and honors presented to University registered organizations and members; and
    12. Eligibility to apply for Student Organization Office Suite (SOOS) or Student Activity Center (SAC) office space and/or storage space.
  2. Achieving and Renewing Registration
    1. In order to exercise the privileges accorded to registered student organizations, students interested in starting a new registered student organization must first write a constitution for the potential student organization and hold a Pre-registration meeting with the appropriate CSIL staff, BEFORE filing the New Organization Registration Form online through OrgSync. This form includes organizational information and the organization’s Constitution and Bylaws. Upon receiving this information, the CSIL staff will review it and submit it to the Student Organization Review Committee (SORC) for consideration. If approved for registration, the SORC will assign the appropriate registration tier (see below).
    2. Eligibility/Registration Requirements
      1. Any group or organization which consists of and maintains at least 80 percent University students, whose purposes are consistent with the educational objectives of the University, and do not violate local, state or federal law, is eligible for registration by the University. To start a new registered student organization, the organization must consist of and maintain at least five (5) individuals as members, of which four (4) must be currently enrolled UI students.
      2. Membership and Leadership. It is the policy of the University that all registered student organizations be able to exercise free choice of members on the basis of their merits as individuals without restriction in accordance with the University Policy on Human Rights. The University acknowledges the interests of students to organize and associate with like-minded students, therefore any individual who subscribes to the goals and beliefs of a student organization may participate in and become a member of the organization.

Membership and participation in the organization must be open to all students without regard to race, creed, color, religion, national origin, age, sex (unless the organization is exempt under Title IX), pregnancy, disability, genetic information, status as a U.S. veteran, service in the U.S. military, sexual orientation, gender identity, associational preferences, or any other classification that deprives the person of consideration as an individual. The organization will guarantee that equal opportunity and equal access to membership, programming, facilities, and benefits shall be open to all persons.

The University shall not deny any benefit or privilege to a student organization based on the student organization’s requirement that the leaders of the student organization agree to and support its beliefs, as those beliefs are interpreted and applied by the student organization, and to further its mission.

 The University will not investigate complaints related to student organization leadership selection processes or final leadership selection by organizations that select their leaders on the basis of a commitment to a set of beliefs or affirmations. These selection processes are defined and enforced by individual student organizations and the university shall respect the organization’s decision-making process.

Membership in a student organization must be composed primarily of UI students (minimum 80% student membership) and be controlled and directed by UI students. Members are individuals who self-select to join an organization; “membership” is different from the audience a student organization targets, serves, or represents. The “audience” is not automatically considered a part of the organization’s membership. Only UI student members shall have voting rights in a student organization. Membership is not open to persons under the age of 18 who are not enrolled UI students. Non-university community members who are at least 18 years of age may participate in the activities of student organizations but may not be voting members. If the student organization desires to allow persons under the age of 18 who are not UI students to participate in the activities of the student organization, the student organization must follow the requirements contained in the Youth Programs Policy Manual for RSOs, including that the youth participant must have permission to participate from a parent or guardian.

As some University services and benefits require knowledge of a student’s membership in the student organization requesting the service or benefit, all organizations are encouraged to have a full membership roster on file with the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership via OrgSync. For example, if a member of a student organization wants to request approval to drive or ride in a university vehicle for an organization event or activity, that member must be listed on the organization’s full membership roster located on OrgSync.

The student organization must be nonprofit in nature; student organizations affiliated with for-profit businesses are not eligible for registration. Student Representatives and student organization members must not profit or benefit financially from student organization membership.

  1. Primary and Secondary Student Representatives. Student Representatives are individuals who are authorized by the organization to speak for or represent the organization in its relations with the University and who are authorized to receive for the organization official notices, directives, or information from the University. Every student organization or potential student organization, registered with the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership/Recreational Services/academic deans via OrgSync must include the names of two student representatives in its Org Profile. Both Representatives must be currently enrolled UI students, and in academic and non-academic good-standing. One name will be designated as the Primary Representative and the other as the Secondary Representative. It is the responsibility of each student organization to update the Org Profile with the current names of Student Representatives. A student organization no longer under the direction of currently enrolled students may lose its registration.
  2. Access to University Resources. Registered student organizations are guaranteed an equal opportunity to apply for funds from mandatory Student Activity fees (i.e., for student organizations) or Recreational Services fees (i.e., for sports clubs) or for any other benefit conferred by the University of Iowa Student Government (UISG) or Graduate and Professional Student Government (GPSG) or their constituent bodies, without differentiation for reasons that violate the University Policy on Human Rights or inhibit the group’s exercise of First Amendment rights of free expression and association. Nothing in this section shall be construed to create or guarantee any expectation of the receipt of funding or other benefits from UISG and/or GPSG and/or Recreational Services by any student organization or to prohibit the individual consideration of the program merits of funding or other proposals submitted by such student organizations.
  3. Registration Procedure. Throughout the year on an ongoing basis, the University will consider applications from student organizations that request to be registered. Registration of student organizations is granted by the Student Organization Review Committee (i.e., on behalf of the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership and Recreational Services) or an academic dean. Registration granted for sports clubs, and fraternities and sororities are subject to additional policies administered by their respective department or student governance organization(s). In order to receive funds from mandatory Student Activity fees (i.e., for student organizations) or Recreational Services fees (i.e., for sports clubs), a student organization must be confirmed by the UISG and/or GPSG or Recreational Services. Greek-letter social organizations are registered by the University of Iowa Interfraternity Council (IFC), Panhellenic Council (PHC), Multicultural Greek Council (MGC), or the National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC).       
    1. To start an organization one must follow the step-by-step process listed on the “Starting an Organization” website.

      Registration of student organizations that are residential living units (i.e., residence hall organizations, fraternities, and sororities) is granted by their respective student governance organization (i.e., Associated Residence Halls [ARH], Interfraternity Council [IFC], Multicultural Greek Council [MGC], National Pan-Hellenic Council [NPHC], and Panhellenic Council [PHC]) with the concurrence of the vice president. 

      The Student Organization Review Committee (SORC) shall review all student organization registration applications. Upon its evaluation, the Committee will register the student organization and forward the organization’s application to the appropriate student governance organization or college/department/unit for confirmation; 2) register the organization subject to specific conditions on activities the organization is permitted to sponsor; or 3) reject the application. If an application is rejected the organization may appeal the decision of the SORC within 30 calendar days upon the receipt of their denial of registration letter. Appeals must be submitted in writing to either the Director of the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership (i.e, for student organizations) or the Director of Recreational Services (i.e., for sport clubs). If an organization appeals and is not satisfied with the decision rendered by the Director of the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership or the Director of Recreational Services they may then submit a final appeal in writing to the Dean of Students. There is no further appeal after the Dean of Students.
  4. Constitution and Bylaws. In order to complete the registration process, all student organizations must have an approved constitution and bylaws. Sponsored and affiliated student organizations (see Section 8, Registration Tiers) must also provide a copy of the charter, constitution, and/or bylaws of any organization external to the University with which such organization may be affiliated. Student organizations are required to include mandatory clauses within their organization constitutions.
  5. Registration of Inter/National Chartered Organizations. In addition to observing all University rules, an organization that is chartered by an inter/national organization, such as a Greek-letter social fraternity or sorority, must maintain its affiliation with the inter/national organization in order to retain its University registration. University registration will cease when the inter/national organization no longer recognizes or sponsors the student organization as an active organization. In this situation, the organization is no longer eligible to affiliate with their respective student governance organization, to participate in activities sponsored by the governance organization or its member organizations, or to access the privileges granted to registered student organizations. Once the inter/national organization has officially returned the student organization to affiliation status, the student organization representatives may apply to the University and the respective student governance organization for registration, although re-registration is not guaranteed. When the University removes registration of a student organization for violating University rules but the organization remains affiliated with the inter/national organization, the student organization will not regain their University registration by virtue of their relationship with the inter/national organization.
  6. Housing Organizations. Student organizations that provide off-campus housing to their student members are considered Housing Organizations. These include Professional Residence Groups, fraternal organizations with a professional focus that are recognized by an academic college, and Undergraduate Residence Groups, which includes Greek-letter organizations that are affiliated with their respective student governance organization.             
    1. In addition to all other student organization policies, Housing Organizations must fulfill the following expectations due to the level of responsibility and complexity involved in the service they provide:
      1. Manage their housing unit;
      2. Enforce internal organization rules;
      3. Ensure that relevant national, state, and local laws and regulations are observed;
      4. Provide safe and healthful lodging and cooperate with city or state agencies responsible for enforcing applicable health and safety laws; and
      5. Observe relevant University policies in their housing facilities, including the Anti-Hazing Policy and the Sexual Misconduct Policy.
    2. Housing Organizations are eligible for the same privileges granted to registered student organizations which do not provide housing.
    3. The responsibility for the regulation and governance of professional fraternities that maintain chapter structures shall be with the Dean of the respective college, including professional fraternities registered by the College of Medicine, the College of Dentistry, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and the Graduate College.
    4. The possession or consumption of alcohol is prohibited in registered undergraduate residence group housing except where explicitly authorized in writing by the vice president.
  7. Governance Organizations.
    1. Registered student organizations are governed by the University of Iowa Student Government (UISG), Graduate and Professional Student Government (GPSG), or Associated Residence Halls (ARH).
    2. Undergraduate social fraternities are governed by the University of Iowa Interfraternity Council, Panhellenic Council, National Pan-Hellenic Council, or the Multicultural Greek Council, which may establish, consistent with the University Policy on Human Rights, additional rules and regulations for recognition of new fraternities, membership selection standards, and standards of conduct.
    3. Reviews. In order to determine whether a student organization is in compliance with a student governance organization regulation or policy, University officials may from time to time review the organization’s record. Information gathered as part of the review may include, but is not limited to, the following: aggregate grade point averages, membership figures, financial reports, internal rules and policies, insurance coverage schedules, educational programs for members, safety and security precautions, compliance with relevant municipal ordinances and state laws, and complaints to the Iowa City police.

II. Registration Tiers

Each student organization granted registration with the University of Iowa is classified as general, affiliated, or sponsored. The registration tier is determined by assessing the student organization's relationship to the University, the purpose and scope of its activities, the University population served, and the perceived potential risk to participants and the University.

The relationship of student organizations to the University is determined by evaluating the student organization’s mission, goals, and activities as they relate to the mission, vision, goals and culture identified by the University in its Strategic Plan.

The privileges and responsibilities associated with each type of registered student organization are outlined below.

  1. General Student Organizations: The privileges of becoming a registered student organization at the University are not extended without careful consideration. General student organizations are those that are consistent with the mission and culture of the University and engage primarily in activities that benefit their membership. These organizations are primarily interest groups capable of functioning with minimal support. The University registers but does not support or endorse the purposes of these general organizations and may not accept responsibility or liability for the activities undertaken by the student organization.

    In addition to the University resources available to all registered student organizations, general student organizations may receive third priority consideration for:

    • Student Activity Center (SAC) storage space; and
    • Reservable space for University-wide annual events at the Iowa Memorial Union, other University facilities, and outdoor venues through the IMU Event Services process and other University scheduling processes.
  2. Affiliated Student Organizations: Affiliated student organizations are those that serve a specific University interest and may provide support to University programs and initiatives. They contribute to the mission, vision, goals, and culture of the University by routinely presenting events for their members, the campus, or their related department’s or unit’s members and invited guests. A University department or unit must provide oversight and direct responsibility for the organization and its activities. Affiliated student organizations also may be directly associated with an academic course and its requirements.

    In addition to the University resources available to all registered student organizations, affiliated student organizations shall comply with any rules, procedures, and expectations established by the responsible University department or unit.

    Because of their broad impact, affiliated student organizations may receive second priority consideration for:

    • Student Organization Office Suite (SOOS) or Student Activity Center (SAC) office or storage space; and
    • Reservable space for University-wide annual events at the Iowa Memorial Union, other University facilities, and outdoor venues through the IMU event services process and other University scheduling processes.

    Affiliated student organizations will need to follow appropriate criteria and guidelines from each University department or unit to receive these services and benefits.

  3. Sponsored Student Organizations: Sponsored student organizations are those considered critical to the mission and culture of the University and work in partnership with a University department or unit. These organizations are linked to the University because of their role representing the University or in presenting events of broad appeal that are considered an integral part of the institution and its activities. Sponsored students organizations routinely present events for the campus and broader community, and typically work in a collaborative relationship with a University department or unit. The student organization's purpose and effect are to serve a broad segment of the campus community, not just its membership.

    Once registered, the events and activities presented by the student organization should accurately and positively reflect the mission, vision, goals and culture of the University, as well as the rules and standards of the institution and its activities. The registration process requires action by both student leaders and University officials. As such, this process creates a mutually beneficial relationship between sponsored student organizations and the University.

    In addition to the University resources available to all registered student organizations, sponsored student organizations shall have:

    • A full-time professional staff or faculty member whose job description designates them as the primary adviser to the sponsored student organization in accordance with student organization registration requirements. These advisers are considered experts within the respective student organization's area of interest;
    • A University department or unit that provides oversight and direct responsibility for the student organization and its activities; and
    • Routinely presented events of broad appeal for the campus and community. Student organization operations and event planning are complex, and the majority of the events/programs are University-wide. Sponsored student organizations routinely present events for the campus and broader community, and are expected to work closely with the appropriate University department or unit in the planning of these events.

    Because of high complexity, sponsored student organizations may receive first priority consideration for:

    • Student Organization Office Suite (SOOS) or Student Activity Center (SAC) office or storage space; and
    • Reservable space for University-wide annual events at the Iowa Memorial Union, other University facilities, and outdoor venues through the IMU event services process and other University scheduling processes.

    Sponsored student organizations must follow appropriate criteria and guidelines from each respective University department or unit to receive these services and benefits.

    III. Tier Appeals

    An appeals process exists for those organizations desiring a registration tier different than that into which they were initially placed. Based on additional information, an organization's registration tier or may be modified also by the Student Organization Review Committee (SORC).

    1. Appeals – Recognition Tier Decision. A student organization has the right to appeal a tier designation decision of the SORC or the determination by the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership to change or modify a student organization's registration tier. An appeal provides a limited review of the original decision. It is not an opportunity to present the evidence again or to re-evaluate credibility. If an error has been made, in most cases the matter will be returned to the SORC so that the error may be corrected.

    One of the following two conditions must be used as a basis for appeal:

    • Discovery of new information that was not available at the time of the decision; and/or
    • The appropriate processes for registering student organizations were not followed.

    The Director of the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership or Recreational Services will act as the appeal administrator. The Associate Director of the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership or Recreational Services will act as the appeal administrator if the Director is unable to serve due to conflict of interest or absence.

    Written documentation stating the grounds for appeal must be filed with the appeal administrator within ten (10) business days of receipt of the original SORC decision.

    The appeal administrator will decide one of the following:

    • Uphold the original decision;
    • Remand the case back to the SORC for reconsideration consistent with the findings of the appeal administrator;
    • Remand for a new registration process review of the student organization; or
    • Modify the registration tier assigned by the SORC.

    The appeal administrator will provide a written decision to the SORC Chair within ten (10) business days of the appeal review. An appeal may be taken within ten (10) business days to the Dean of Students.

IV. Registration Renewal

  1. Each student organization must renew its Profile on OrgSync at or near the beginning of the fall (between Aug. 1-Sept. 15) and spring (Jan. 1-Feb. 15) semesters, even if there are no changes from the previous semester in primary and/or secondary representative and contact information. A student organization that does not update and renew its profile will lose its registration automatically for one semester. Any changes in primary or secondary representative or changes in contact information must be reflected in the profile. Registered student organizations must provide complete and accurate information as requested in the profile. If additional information is needed, student organization representatives must provide information upon request to the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership or Recreational Services. For those student organizations that are registered by an academic college as well as by a student government, student leaders are advised to check with the college/department/unit regarding registration deadlines.
  2. Periodically, the Student Organization Review Committee reviews the status of student organizations to ensure the safety and welfare of students who participate in activities sponsored by the organization. Depending upon the results of its evaluation, the Committee will 1) register the student organization; 2) register the student organization subject to specific conditions on activities the organization is permitted to sponsor; or 3) recommend to the Director of the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership or Director of Recreational Services that registration be denied.

V. Organizational Registration Changes

  1. During the year, registered student organizations must report to the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership or Recreational Services any amendments to or changes in its student organization name, constitution, by-laws, student representatives, and/or advisers within two weeks of the changes becoming effective. Registered student organizations also must submit any additional information requested from time to time by their respective registering body.

VI. Advisers

  1. Student organization advisers are strongly encouraged for all registered student organizations. Advisers shall be faculty members whenever possible in order to promote student-faculty interaction beyond the classroom. Professional & Scientific staff with advising experience and/or relevant expertise also may serve as student organization advisers. Merit staff, with advising experience and/or relevant expertise also may serve as student organization advisers upon approval from the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership, Recreational Services, or academic dean. A non-University affiliated individual may serve as an adviser to a student organization only if they serve as a liaison to a local/regional/national organization with which the registered student organization has an official affiliation.
  2. Student organization advisers must be employed at the University on at least a .5 FTE basis. The Division of Student Life shall have the right not to approve advisers of student organizations who are on disciplinary status as determined by the appropriate University department or unit.
  3. All student organization advisers are strongly encouraged to participate in the adviser training programs sponsored by the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership. The Center for Student Involvement & Leadership and Recreational Services will provide specific information to student organizations about these requirements.
  4. Graduate assistants, with at least 50% appointments, may serve as additional advisers in conjunction with student organization advisers who meet the requirements stated above; however, they will not have signatory authority (e.g., financial transactions, contracts, vouchers).

VII. Space Allocation for Registered Student Organizations

  1. Limited office or storage space is available to registered student organizations in the Student Organization Office Suite (SOOS) or Student Activity Center (SAC) in the Iowa Memorial Union. Student organizations allocated space in the SOOS or SAC must abide by the policies in regard to use of office or storage space. Application forms for the office and storage space are available online through the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership website (http://csil.uiowa.edu/). Office and storage space requests are reviewed biennially by the CSIL Space Allocation Committee and recommendations for assignment of space are made to the Director of the Iowa Memorial Union and Center for Student Involvement & Leadership. Sport Clubs are required to follow all policies in regard to storage space established by Recreational Services.

Administration of Registered Student Organizations

University Administration has authority to manage the policies within this document and to take action based on them, together with other University policies and all applicable law. Registered student organizations must adhere to the policies outlined below. Unless otherwise denoted hereafter, the use of the term “student organization” shall include sports clubs registered by Recreational Services.

I. Financial Management & Reporting

Student organization funds may not be allocated for purposes prohibited by University policy. The Center for Student Involvement & Leadership, in cooperation with UISG and GPSG, and Recreational Services conduct mandatory financial information meetings annually. Each student organization is responsible for having at least one representative present at these mandatory financial information meetings. Student organizations must allow two weeks for most payment processing.

  1. Accounts: No University of Iowa student organization shall have an outside bank account without written authorization from the vice president. Student organizations are required to transact all financial business through the Student Organization Business Office or Recreational Services (i.e., for sports clubs).This offers the advantage of a permanent record of transactions, a detailed monthly statement of account, and the purchasing power of the University. Failure to do so may result in revocation of registration. Student organizations registered by an academic college or affiliated with a University department or unit may transact business through the sponsoring college/department/unit. Professional housing organizations may transact business through the Fraternity Business Service.
  2. Cash-handling: Student organizations are required to follow all cash-handling policies established by the Student Organization Business Office, Recreational Services, or UI Accounts Payable and Purchasing Departments.
  3. Equipment Purchases: When certain purchases are made for student organizations or when certain types of acquisitions, including but not limited to, the examples noted below, are made by any student organization using mandatory Student Activity fees or Recreational Services fees, the acquisitions become University property and/or the University inherits certain risks and obligations. To help protect the University, the student organization, its members, and its adviser, such acquisitions must be consistent with University policy, follow University procurement procedures, and be processed through UI Purchasing. A University department or unit must be willing to assume ownership and take responsibility for maintenance, storage, insurance costs (if any), and appropriate use before funds can be allocated to a registered student organization and before the acquisition can be made. The University department or unit assuming responsibility must process a requisition for these items through UI Purchasing. Examples of these acquisitions include, but are not limited to:
    1. Equipment items with a cost of $5,000 or more that are placed on the University’s inventory;
    2. Printing and copying jobs done outside the University
    3. Ordering or printing goods with a design, without UI Licensing approval
    4. Personal items or services
    5. Alcohol/firearms/ammunition
    6. Telephones other than University campus phones
    7. Animals
    8. Radioactive or hazardous materials
    9. Wagers or gambling of any sort
    10. Other equipment or services identified by the Office of Risk Management, Insurance & Loss Prevention that have liability exposure. When a question exists regarding liability exposure, the registered student organization or the college/department/unit should contact the Office of Risk Management.
    11. Non-Profit Status: The University of Iowa is a non-profit entity; Student organizations do not share this status.
    12. Tax Exemption Status: Student organizations are exempt from paying sales tax on the gross receipts from goods and services rendered in fulfilling its purpose as an educational institution when utilizing University-based forms of payment (i.e., procurement cards, vouchers, etc.).
    13. Payment for Services:
      1. Check Voucher: Student organizations must pay a vendor with a check when the vendor does not accept credit cards, the student organization is donating money, or the total purchase exceeds $5,000. Authorized signers, as listed in OrgSync, must first complete, sign, and submit a check voucher. Checks are printed by UI Accounts Payable and may be obtained by a member of the student organization or the University can mail it to the vendor.
      2. Individual Services Voucher: Student organizations must pay an individual for services (a speaker, performer, student worker, referee, etc.) by completing an appropriate contract (signed by the payee and the appropriate University administrator) and an individual services voucher. Payment will not be processed without completing both the appropriate contract and individual services voucher.
      3. Credit Card Payments: Student organizations may request to use a Student Organization Business Office (SOBO) credit card (for most routine purchases under $5000). Sport Clubs must see the Financial Management & Reporting Supplemental Guide for Sport Club credit card use. Student organizations must complete a Credit Card Request form and all expenses incurred will be charged to the student organization’s account. Credit Card Request forms must be completed, signed, and submitted to SOBO 24 hours prior to picking up a credit card.
      4. Philanthropic Contributions
        1. Monies benefiting student organizations: Student organizations are not able to offer tax-deductibility to individuals and/or businesses when collecting donations, contributions, and/or sponsorships. Accordingly, when student organizations undertake fundraising projects, they need to inform potential contributors that the donor contributions will not be tax deductible.
        2. Student organizations must provide proof that organization membership voted to approve the contribution/donation to the benefitting agency. Submit meeting minutes to SOBO or Recreational Services that document the approval and complete an Event Information Form (EIF). Once the EIF is approved, the organization must submit a complete and signed check voucher.
        3. Receiving Online Payment: Student organizations utilizing online registration through which a financial transaction is occurring that will benefit the student organization must utilize the University approved vendor for online payment.

II. Funding Resources

Registered student organizations are guaranteed an equal opportunity to apply for funds from mandatory Student Activity fees (i.e., for student organizations) or Recreational Services fees (i.e., for sports clubs) or for any other benefit conferred by the University of Iowa Student Government (UISG) or Graduate and Professional Student Government (GPSG) or their constituent bodies, without differentiation for reasons that violate the University Policy on Human Rights or inhibit the group’s exercise of First Amendment rights of free expression and association. Nothing in this section shall be construed to create or guarantee any expectation of the receipt of funding or other benefits from UISG and/or GPSG and/or Recreational Services by any student organization or to prohibit the individual consideration of the program merits of funding or other proposals submitted by such student organizations.

Student organizations must follow all University cash-handling policies as established by the Student Organization Business Office, Recreational Services, or UI Accounts Payable and Purchasing Departments.

  1. Sponsorships: Student organizations must receive permission to request funds or other valuable assets. A student organization must first file an Event Information Form with the Student Organization Business Office or Recreational Services and receive permission before sponsorship requests can be made. Monetary donations received by the student organization may not be converted to private use and must be deposited in the organization’s account.
    1. Commercial Sponsorship (received from businesses or corporations)
      1. In-kind sponsorship: Student organizations may request and receive contributions (e.g., coupons, gift cards, food, venue rental) from businesses to benefit the organization’s activities. Federal financial aid regulations require the University account for all aid, including gift cards provided to students, if the student is a recipient of need-based financial aid. If the recipient of the gift card receives financial aid from the UI Office of Student Financial Aid, this action may impact the amount of financial aid the student receives.
      2. Monetary sponsorship: Student organizations may request and receive monetary contributions from businesses to benefit the organization’s activities.
      1. University Co-sponsorship (received from a UI college/department/unit or student organization)
        1. In-kind sponsorship: Student organizations may request and receive contributions (e.g., coupons, gift cards, food, venue rental) from UI colleges/departments/units or other student organizations to benefit the organization’s activities. Federal financial aid regulations require that the University account for all aid, including gift cards provided to students, if the student is a recipient of need-based financial aid. If the recipient of the gift card receives financial aid from the UI Office of Student Financial Aid, this action may impact the amount of financial aid the student receives.
        2. Monetary sponsorship: Student organizations may request and receive monetary contributions from UI colleges/departments/units or student organizations to benefit the organization’s activities.
      2. Sponsorship of external vendor for profit: University policy permits student organizations to sponsor for profit businesses, the University regulates the time, place, and frequency of these opportunities. An off-campus enterprise whose items or services are being marketed by a student organization may be required to indemnify the University and provide adequate insurance well in advance of the event as a precondition of the approval.
  2. Sales
    1. Raffles: A raffle is a form of gambling and raffle sales will be taxed. Student organizations must complete and sign the gambling license application form and submit to Student Organization Business Office (SOBO) for approval, in addition to completing an Event Information Form (EIF) for the event. If approved, a copy of the gambling license must be obtained at the SOBO and displayed at any location where raffle tickets are being sold, and at the time the winner is announced. Student organizations must use a secure cash box (available for rent from the IMU Business Office). Gambling other than raffles is prohibited. Additional requirements are included on the gambling license application form and must be followed to receive approval.
    2. Event/Tournament/Program Admission: Student organizations are allowed to charge admission to events/tournaments/programs. Admission revenues collected are taxable and receipts must be submitted to the Student Organization Business Office or Recreational Services.
    3. Event/Tournament/Program Registration: Student organizations are allowed to charge registration fees to events/tournaments/programs. Registration revenues collected are taxable and receipts must be submitted to the Student Organization Business Office or Recreational Services.
    4. Merchandise: Student organizations are allowed to sell items for profit outside of their membership. Merchandise sales are taxable and receipts must be submitted to the Student Organization Business Office or Recreational Services.
    5. Prohibited Activities:
      1. Bar Crawls
      2. Date/People Auctions
      3. Car Smash

III. Programs/Events/Tournaments

Student organizations may participate alone or with others in planning, promoting, financing, executing, and evaluating a program/event/tournament, hereafter referred to as event. An event is considered to be sponsored by a student organization when organization members are notified in a regular or special meeting or by a special announcement or posting, or when the financial responsibility is met by the organization, or when specific plans or arrangements are made to conduct an event. Absence of members at an event does not relieve the organization from responsibility as a sponsor. However, presence of members of a student organization at an event does not automatically qualify that organization as a sponsor unless the organization itself took part in planning, announcing, discussing, financing, or executing the event.

Student organizations sponsoring events must have a balance on hand in its student organization account to cover the costs of the program, including facility rental, Student Organization Business Office charges, speaker’s fee, advertising, and other expenses, or adequate funds must be deposited with the organization by an underwriter, which funds cannot be repaid until all costs and expenses incurred by the organization in presenting the event have been satisfied. No advertising or publicizing of any commercial product or trade name shall be permitted without prior approval.

  1. Time, Place, Manner: Student organizations may have events at 1) reasonable times and places, 2) in a manner consistent with the educational purposes of the University, 3) under reasonable conditions imposed by the University officials charged with control of the areas involved, and 4) under any rules prescribed by the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership, Recreational Services, IMU Event Services, and colleges/departments/units.
    1. Conditions: In determining the reasonableness of the time, place, and manner of the planned event or activity the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership, Recreational Services, IMU Event Services, and Facilities Management, Space Planning & Utilization shall consider whether the proposed activity conflicts with regularly scheduled University activities or other scheduled events in the area. Other reasonable time, place, and manner conditions may be imposed as a precondition of conducting the activity (e.g., an applicant may be asked for information regarding the anticipated number of participants and spectators, the adequacy of arrangements for crowd control, parking, and sanitary facilities).
    2. No event request shall be denied unless the applicant is apprised of the reasons for the denial. In the case of a denial, an immediate appeal shall be afforded by the vice president or their designee.
  2. Registration Requirements (Event Information Form): An Event Information Form (EIF) is required for events with one of the following situations:
    1. Reservations for space with a rental fee, Hubbard Park, Kautz Plaza/Pentacrest (if spending money), hosting a speaker, blood drives, tournaments, bake sales, rallies, showing or playing copyrighted material (movies), or charging admission/collecting funds, or any other reservation deemed as required by Center for Student Involvement & Leadership, Recreational Services, or IMU Event Services.
    2. The form is initiated with IMU Event Services or Recreational Services. The student representative is responsible for obtaining the appropriate signatures and returning the form to the IMU Event Services Office or Recreational Services for final review. Completed forms, accompanied by any necessary payments, must be returned before a reservation will be confirmed. EIF’s should be initiated one month before the event date and returned completed and ready for the final signature from IMU Event Services or Recreational Services two (2) weeks before the event date. Groups hosting events in a General Assignment Classroom will require an EIF if they are hosting an outside speaker, political candidate, showing or playing copyrighted material (movie), or tabling.
  3. Use of University Space & Facilities: Student organizations may use University space and facilities with written permission subject to University regulations. In order to seek written permission to use University space and facilities, student organizations must submit an Event Information Form at the appropriate office (IMU Event Services or Recreational Services as explained above). Requests for use of space within University Housing should be submitted to the Hall Manager of the building in which the desired space is located. Requests to use Recreational Services facilities must be made to Recreational Services.
    1. Charges: Student organizations that are permitted to use available University space and facilities may be charged an amount commensurate with the expense incurred by the University in making the facility available.
    2. General Assignment Classrooms: Student organizations must visit IMU Event Services to initiate the reservation process for a general assignment classroom in an academic building. Events that cannot be accommodated in the IMU will be referred to the Classroom Scheduling Office for room availability.
      1. Cash transactions are not permitted in General Assignment Classrooms.
      2. Food is not permitted in General Assignment Classrooms.
    3. Policies regarding Pentacrest use (University Operations Manual)
    4. Policies regarding other outdoor space use (University Operations Manual)
  4. Risk Management: The process of identifying and assessing risk in developing strategies to avoid personal injury, property damage, and resultant financial loss. Student organizations should consult with the appropriate college/department/unit to identify, assess, and develop strategies around potential risk management issues. Student organizations should also consider reputational and emotional risks to the University, their organization, the community, and individuals when developing organization programs.
    1. Waiver & Release Forms: Student organizations may be required to work with the Office of Risk Management, Insurance, & Loss Prevention to assess the need for and develop a waiver and release form for certain types of events (e.g., physical activities, travel).
    2. Insurance: Student organizations may be required to work with the Office of Risk Management, Insurance, & Loss Prevention to assess the need for and potentially purchase special event insurance for organization-sponsored events (e.g., inflatables, races, competitions).
  5. Philanthropic Programs & Fundraisers: Student organizations are allowed to plan and host events that raise awareness and/or funds for charity.
    1. Bake Sales: Student organizations are permitted to conduct bakes sales in the IMU, Recreational Services facilities, or academic colleges at specified areas or on Hubbard Park. All regulations set by the Johnson County Department of Public Health and IMU/Recreational Services/academic colleges must be strictly followed. An EIF is required for all bake sales.
    2. Race Events: Student organizations are permitted to plan and host competitive and non-competitive race events (e.g., fun-runs; timed walk, run, wheel races) to raise awareness and/or funds for charity. Student organizations must meet with and receive approval from the appropriate staff in the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership. Event Information Forms are required for all race events.
  6. Registration of Programs to which Admission is Charged and/or Donations are Accepted: Student organizations may sponsor entertainment, tournaments, or lecture programs to which a general admission fee is charged provided such programs are registered with IMU Events Services or Recreational Services at least two weeks in advance. No contracts or other financial commitments may be made by the sponsoring student organization until registration is completed. When admission is charged or donations are accepted at an event held on campus, the IMU Business Office or Recreational Services must approve the method to collect the money. The persons interested in obtaining the IMU Business Office fee schedule should contact the IMU Business Office. Student organizations must make all financial arrangements with the Student Organization Business Office or Recreational Services.
  7. Guest Speakers: Student organizations may invite guest lecturers, panel participants, discussion leaders, or others from off-campus to speak or otherwise participate in campus programs provided such programs are registered at least one week in advance. Event Information Forms are required for all guest speakers. Final arrangements with guest speakers should not be made by the sponsoring student organization until registration has been completed.
    1. In the event the speaker or the issues are controversial, the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership, Recreational Services, or college/department/unit may require the sponsoring student organization to 1) obtain a tenured member of the faculty to chair the program or 2) provide for the speaker to be subjected to questions from the audience at some time during the program. For more information see University Operations Manual section V-28.
  8. Political Activities & Campaigning: Candidates for municipal, county, state, or federal political offices are permitted to campaign on campus under limited circumstances. Student organizations that support the election or defeat of a particular candidate, party, or ballot issue may 1) advertise meetings and events on campus; 2) reserve tables in the designated area(s) of the Iowa Memorial Union; and 3) reserve University facilities for meetings and events. These privileges are subject to space limitations and appropriate University regulations regarding use. A visit to campus by a candidate for a non-university elected office or by an agent for such a candidate must be sponsored by a student organization. Arrangements for the student organization sponsored visit of a political candidate must be facilitated by the Director of the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership. 
    1. Political Activities in Residence Halls: University Housing & Dining offers politicians and political organizations access to residence hall students on a limited basis. A politician or political organization is defined as: candidates for public office, candidates running for University of Iowa Student Government (UISG), political organizations (both student and non-student) campaigning for election or campaigning on behalf of issues on the public ballot, or organizations that are sponsoring a political event.
    2. Student Government: Candidates for student government positions must follow election rules as established in the Student Elections Code.
  9. Tabling: Information tables may be reserved by a student organization to disseminate information, or to collect funds or other support (e.g., signatures, supplies) from persons outside its membership. Tables may be reserved in the IMU, Recreational Services facilities, or some colleges/departments/units. An Event Information Form may be required, and all reservation policies must be followed, for all table reservations in the IMU and Recreational Services facilities.
  10. Alcohol (Refer to Section VII below)
  11. Prohibited Activities include, but are not limited to:
    1. Bar Crawls
    2. Date/People Auctions
    3. Car Smash
    4. Balloon/Lantern Releases

IV. Publicity & Marketing

  1. Printing: Student organizations are prohibited from using student organization funds to purchase or obtain printing or copying services from vendors external to the University. Reimbursement to student organization members, who may have paid for external printing or copying services on behalf of the student organization, is prohibited.
  2. Design Approval/Licensing: All printed design orders must be approved by the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership or Recreational Services before any orders can be placed. Approval from University of Iowa’s Trademark Licensing Office is required if the design includes use of any University of Iowa trademarks, logos, or indicia. Please refer to the Student Organization Licensing Policy  for complete information.
  3. Websites: Student organizations may develop a website that must be hosted on the University of Iowa network or UI-approved vendor. The following disclaimer must be included on a student organization homepage: “The statements, expressed opinions and links displayed on (your organization’s name) web pages are generated and posted by the student members of (your organization’s name). No official endorsement or approval by the University of Iowa of the viewpoints expressed on this web page or any of the student organization activities described on this web page should be inferred. The activities and events of this student organization are not necessarily sponsored or approved by the University of Iowa.”
    1. All student organizations are responsible for complying with the University’s policy regarding “Acceptable Use of Technology Resources” located at http://opsmanual.uiowa.edu/ 
  4. Chalking. Chalking of sidewalks is a means of expression. It may be used in many ways, including to announce programs, promote events, exchange opinions, share messages, and otherwise express ideas. This policy is designed to permit sidewalk chalking while also advancing important university interests, including but not limited to ensuring campus safety, safeguarding entrances and exits to and from university facilities, protecting University property and facilities, and maintaining the aesthetic appeal of campus. Policy related to chalking applies to all University students, staff, faculty, affiliates, invited guests, and visitors. Chalking on campus sidewalks is permitted subject to the viewpoint-neutral time, place, and manner restrictions detailed below. 
    1. Chalking is limited to: the use of water-soluble chalk (sidewalk chalk). The use of markers, paints, oil-based products, nonsoluble products, and spray chalks is prohibited. 
    2. Chalking is permitted only on: horizontal (flat) sidewalks that are open to the elements (i.e., sidewalk that is not covered by a roof or overhang). 
    3. Chalking is prohibited on all vertical surfaces and all non-sidewalk surfaces, both inside and outside, including benches, buildings, bus stops, bridges, columns, fountains, monuments, newsstands, overhangs, planters, poles, roads, rocks, signs, statues, stairs/steps, trash receptacles, trees, walls, and windows. 
    4. Chalking is not allowed in any of the following areas (see Iowa Code Chapter 261H.1(4)), as depicted in this PDF iconcampus map:
      1. areas outside health care facilities, including stand-alone facilities and mixed-use facilities that are embedded within another facility; 
      2. veterinary medicine facilities;
      3. any facility or outdoor area used by the University’s athletics program or teams, including the following: all athletic and multi-use facilities (Duane Banks Field [baseball], Ashton Cross Country Course, Grant Field [field hockey], Pearl Field [softball], Kenyon Football Practice Facility, Kretzmeyer Track, Carver-Hawkeye Arena, Finkbine Golf Course, Recreation Building, Indoor Practice Facility, Field House, Campus Recreation and Wellness Center, Hawkeye Tennis and Recreation Center, and other outdoor and indoor practice facilities and playing fields); and
      4. any other outdoor areas where access is restricted to a majority of the campus community.
    5. Overwriting, erasing, defacing, or altering existing chalking is prohibited by anyone other than the person or organization who did the chalking, except that University facility and grounds personnel will clean and wash sidewalks, plazas, and other outdoor areas in the course of their usual and ordinary campus maintenance activities.
    6. Chalking that violates any federal or state law or any other University of Iowa policy is prohibited.
    7. Commercial solicitation, advertising and sales, including through chalking, are not permitted on campus except as explicitly permitted by IAC (681)13.15.
  5. Posting: Student organizations that wish to post on campus bulletin boards and Cambus, must adhere to the policies established by the respective facility or college/department/unit regarding the posting of materials on campus. Student organizations are responsible for contacting the appropriate facility staff or college/department/unit for applicable policies.
  6. Mass Email: Student organizations wishing to send a mass e-mail to members of the UI community must obtain permission from the vice president. Student organizations may send one mass e-mail per semester through the University mass e-mail system.
  7. Digital Signage: Student organizations that wish to post on campus digital signage (electronic displays) must adhere to the policies established by the respective facilities or colleges/departments/units regarding the posting of digital signage. Student organizations are responsible for contacting the appropriate facility staff or college/department/unit for applicable policies.
  8. Tabling: See section III.I
  9. Distribution of Fliers, Handbills, and Leaflets: Student organizations are allowed to distribute information to publicize an upcoming event that the organization is sponsoring that will be open to all students. Spontaneous distribution of materials does not require approval as long as it is not disruptive, does not interfere with scheduled University activities, or violates any University policy.

V. Travel

Student organizations may submit a request to travel for reasons that are consistent with the organization’s/University’s mission and purpose, individual/organizational leadership and development, or to participate in programs that contribute to the University’s strategic priority of student success.

  1. UI Vehicle Rental: Student Organizations may rent a vehicle from University of Iowa Fleet Services.
    1. Approved uses: Requests for vehicle usage from UI Fleet Services will only be approved for travel to a national or regional conference, or national or regional academic or athletic competition.
    2. Processes: Student organizations must complete and submit appropriate paperwork to the Student Organization Business Office or Recreational Services.
    3. Training: Student organization leaders must complete necessary training as required by UI Fleet Services.
    4. Related Costs: Student organizations are responsible for costs associated with vehicle rental.
    5. Cambus Rental: Student organizations may request to rent a Cambus vehicle and driver services for a student organization sponsored activity or event. Student organizations are responsible for costs associated with the rental.
    6. Transporting of the following is strictly prohibited:
      1. Alcohol
      2. Guns/Weapons/Ammunition
      3. Bottled gases
      4. Chemicals
      5. Individuals not approved to travel by the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership or Recreational Services
  2. Non-UI Vehicle Rental
    1. Charter Buses: Student organizations may hire a professional charter service to provide transportation service for a sponsored event. Student organizations must follow University policy regarding contracts. See section below.
  3. Use of Personal Vehicles: In the event vehicles are not available from UI Fleet Services for approved purposes, student organizations may allow use of privately owned or rental vehicles for the above purposes with prior written authorization (the University may require proof of insurance). Rental fees, mileage, or other expenses incurred by individuals or organizations in violation of this policy are not an allowable University travel expense and will not be reimbursed. (From Ops Manual V.19)
  4. Use of 3rd Party Travel Agency: Student organizations may hire an external travel agency to provide planning services for an approved, organization trip. Student organizations must follow University policy regarding contracts. See section below.
  5. Lodging: Student organizations must follow all Student Organization Business Office or Recreational Services processes for reserving and paying for hotel accommodations for approved student organization travel.
  6. Prohibited Activity:
    1. International Travel with the Exception of Canada: Student organizations are not allowed to plan, sponsor, or coordinate trips that occur outside of the continental United States.
    2. Discounts for Individuals Planning Trips: No student organization member(s) may receive discount benefits for providing event coordination or sale of travel packages, which are not made available to all travel participants.

VI. Contracts & Agreements

Student organizations and student organization members are not allowed to sign or enter into contracts or binding agreements on behalf of the student organization or the University. Contracts exist to outline expectations and responsibilities of the involved parties, and are not limited to arrangements involving payment for services. Student organizations must complete and submit an Event Information Form to the Student Organization Business Office or Recreational Services when processing a contract.

  1. Processes: Student organizations are required to process all contracts through the Student Organization Business Office or Recreational Services. Types of contracts include:
    1. Agency or Business issued
    2. UI Issued
    3. Service Agency Agreement: student organizations are required to follow the policies outlined by the Office of Risk Management, Insurance, and Loss Prevention when establishing these agreements.

VII. Alcohol

All student organizations must abide by University rules governing possession and consumption of alcoholic beverages. University alcohol regulations are described in Section II (D) of the Policies & Regulations affecting Students. University policy prohibits the use of University funds for the purchase of alcoholic beverages for events on campus or off-campus. In addition, any reference to alcohol in advertising for the activity shall be omitted. In the event that state laws concerning sale, possession, and consumption of alcoholic beverages are not observed during an event sponsored by a student organization, the organization’s registration may be revoked. An Event Information Form is required for all student organization events requesting alcoholic beverage service. 

  1. Alcoholic Beverage Service
    1. On-Campus: As a general policy, alcoholic beverage service will not be available to student organizations sponsoring events in the Iowa Memorial Union/Recreational Services facilities/academic colleges.
      1. Parameters: All beverage service (alcoholic and non-alcoholic) will be supplied by UI Catering subject to availability of facilities, staff and supplies. Under Iowa State law, the IMU, or any University department or organization, may not accept free alcoholic beverages from an outside source or funds from a distributor. The dispensing and control of alcoholic beverages within the IMU/Recreational Services facilities/academic colleges is the responsibility of UI Catering and IMU Administration with final approval from the vice president. All money collected by the UI Catering from alcohol sales will be deposited in a designated university account. Under no circumstances is a sponsoring organization to receive money collected as a result of alcohol sales.
        1. Organization Classification
          1. Undergraduate: Student organizations whose membership is composed primarily of undergraduate students who are under the age of 21 are not allowed to sponsor events with alcoholic beverage service on campus. Student organizations whose membership is composed of primarily undergraduate students who are over the age of 21 may be eligible to request alcoholic beverage service as an amenity to a program held on campus.
          2. Graduate & Professional: Student organizations whose membership is composed of graduate or professional students over the age of 21 may request alcoholic beverage service as an amenity to a program held on campus.
          3. Greek-letter chapters: Student organizations affiliated with the Interfraternity Council, Panhellenic Council, National Pan-Hellenic Council, or Multicultural Greek Council must abide by the Events Policy established by their respective student governance organization.
      2. Service Requests & Approval Processes:
        1. The student organization must submit a proposal outlining the rationale as to why the organization is requesting alcoholic beverage service. This proposal must accompany the Event Information Form and Alcoholic Beverage Service Request Form.
        2. A request form for alcoholic beverage service must accompany the Event Information Form and be submitted to the IMU Event Services Office no later than 14 working days prior to the scheduled date of the event. If approved, all State, University, and IMU/University Catering policies and procedures related to the sale and service of alcoholic beverages will be observed. Additional information regarding the sale, distribution, and consumption of alcoholic beverages in the IMU and on campus is contained in the IMU Alcohol Beverage Service policy.
        3. University administration retains the right to require additional precautionary and risk management strategies to events where alcohol is present.
    2. Off-Campus: As a general policy, alcoholic beverage service will not be available to student organizations sponsoring events off-campus.
      1. Parameters: Student organizations may hold events at a third party venue with a liquor license if arrangements have been made to secure and prohibit the sale and/or consumption of alcoholic beverages within the event space. A signed contract or agreement with the vendor must be submitted to the Student Organization Business Office or Recreational Services at least two weeks prior to the event date.
        1. Undergraduate: Student organizations whose membership is composed primarily of undergraduate students who are under the age of 21 are not allowed to sponsor events with alcoholic beverage service off-campus. Student organizations whose membership is composed of primarily of undergraduate students who are over the age of 21 may be eligible to request alcoholic beverage service as an amenity to a program held off-campus.
        2. Graduate & Professional: Student organizations whose membership is composed of graduate or professional students over the age of 21 may request alcoholic beverage service as an amenity to a program held off-campus.
        3. Greek-letter chapters: Student organizations affiliated with the Interfraternity Council, Panhellenic Council, National Pan-Hellenic Council, or Multicultural Greek Council must by the Events Policy established by their respective student governance organization.
        4. Requirements for request submission. All requirements outlined below must be submitted at least 14 days prior to the event date:
          1. The student organization must submit a proposal outlining the rationale as to why the organization is requesting alcoholic beverage service. This proposal must accompany the Event Information Form and Alcoholic Beverage Service Request Form.
          2. If the student organization is selecting a theme for the event, it must be an appropriate theme. The event theme should correspond with the values of the organization.
          3. Submit required paperwork for all third party venues:
            1. Venue Facilities Agreement (your contract or agreement with the venue you are using for your event)
            2. Venue Certificate of Liability Insurance (proof of at least a million dollar insurance policy that verifies that the third party vendor is insured for any instances that may occur).
            3. Transportation Agreement and Insurance (if providing members and guests with bus services).
          4. Venue, room or establishment must be rented out exclusively to the sponsoring student organization (otherwise this is considered an OPEN EVENT, which is not allowed.)
          5. Liquor License
  2. Prohibited Activities (Include, but are not limited to):
    1. Bar Crawls
    2. Off-campus events at un-approved locations/venues

VIII. Hazing

  1. Hazing is any intentional or unintentional reckless action or situation – with or without consent – that endangers a student or creates risk of injury, mental or physical discomfort, harassment, embarrassment, and/or ridicule – whether on campus or off campus – for the purpose of initiation into, affiliation with, or as a condition for continued membership in any registered student organization at the University of Iowa.
  2. Acts of hazing include, but are not limited to: compulsory alcohol or drug consumption; physical brutality; psychological cruelty; public humiliation; morally degrading activities; forced confinement; creation of excessive fatigue; required removal or destruction of public or private property; or any other activity that endangers the physical, mental, psychological, or academic well-being and/or safety of an individual. Any requirement imposed upon prospective, new, or current members which is not related to the organization's purpose is discouraged and will become the subject of a University investigation once the practice is brought to the attention of the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership/Recreational Services/academic colleges.
  3. This policy applies to all registered student organizations and their student leaders/members. Some University programs promulgate anti-hazing policies specifically for students participating in their programs. The Department of Athletics enforces a hazing policy, as does the UI Interfraternity Council, Panhellenic Council, Multicultural Greek Council, and National Pan-Hellenic Council. Copies are available at the respective department offices.

Discipline of Registered Student Organizations

The University of Iowa’s Student Organization Discipline Procedure is designed to provide a process to investigate and resolve alleged violations of University policies by student organizations, including fraternities, sororities, and sport clubs registered by Recreational Services. The Discipline Procedure is not a substitute for the civil or criminal court system. Rather, the Discipline Procedure provides a mechanism for the University to determine if University policies have been violated and act in accordance with the findings.

Unless otherwise denoted, the use of the term “student organization” shall include all registered student organizations associated with the University of Iowa. This includes all student organizations registered by the Leadership, Service and Civic Engagement, Recreational Services, student governance organizations (USG, GPSG, IFC, PHC, MGC, NPHC, ARH), or an academic college/department/unit.

Fraternity and sorority chapters affiliated with the Interfraternity Council (IFC), Panhellenic Council (PHC), National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC), or Multicultural Greek Council (MGC) must also abide by the judicial policies established by their respective governing body and are subject to their respective council’s judicial processes.

  • I: General Information Regarding Student Organization Discipline

    I. General Information Regarding Student Organization Discipline

    The University of Iowa expects all registered student organizations to act in congruence with the values of the University community. Additionally, the rights and duties of registered student organizations also carry with them an obligation on the part of their members, collectively, to uphold the University of Iowa Code of Student Life.

    1. Jurisdiction: This Student Organization Discipline Procedure generally governs reports that allege student organization violations of University policies or organizational policies including, but not limited to, rules promulgated by the respective student governance organization.

    a. As referenced in the Registration of Student Organizations policy, the university will not adjudicate or hear appeals related to student organization leadership selection processes or final leadership selection by organizations that select their leadership on the basis of a commitment to a set of beliefs or affirmations. These selection processes are defined and enforced by individual student organizations and the university shall respect the organization’s decision-making process.
    b. Formal complaints of bias, harassment, discrimination, equity, free speech, and sexual misconduct concerns should be made to the Office of Institutional Equity (OIE). 

    2. Standard of Evidence: The standard of evidence used for cases investigated using the Student Accountability Procedure is a “preponderance of the evidence.” If the investigator determines that it is more likely than not that no policy violation occurred, the report will be dismissed. If the investigator determines that it is more likely than not that one or more University policies were violated, a sanction or sanctions will be imposed.

    3. Rules Governing Student Organizations: In order to remain registered as a UI student organization, organization members are expected to observe at all times internal policies of the organization, including but not limited to rules set by the state, national, or international headquarters. In addition, student organizations affiliated with one or more University of Iowa student governance organizations are bound to observe the rules of the respective governance organization(s). Violation of internal organization rules or rules set by a student governance organization may be grounds for a University investigation and disciplinary sanctions.

    4. Organization Disciplinary Records: Student organization disciplinary records will be managed by the Office of Student Accountability. All records related to student organization conduct will be kept in the student organization’s official file.

    5. Group vs. Individual Responsibility: A registered student organization may be held accountable for the behavior of its members and guests. An organization’s officers or members are encouraged to seek assistance from University offices (UI Department of Public Safety, Leadership, Service, and Civic Engagement, Student Engagement & Campus Programs, Fraternity and Sorority Life Programs, Office of Student Accountability, etc.) or outside agencies (police, fire department, ambulance) proactively to mitigate possible violations.

    The University will determine whether alleged violations of policy are individual or organizational in nature. Generally, a student organization may be held responsible for violations of University policy when:

    a. A policy or practice of the student organization was responsible for a violation, including:

    i. The violation was committed at an activity funded, co-sponsored, or endorsed by the organization or by an individual in the name of the organization and/or the misconduct occurred on property owned, controlled, rented, leased, and/or used by the student organization and/or any of its members/alumni acting on the student organization’s behalf;
    ii. Members, officers, or advisors failed to report knowledge or information about a violation to appropriate University authorities;

    b. One or more officers, acting within the scope of their stated or written duties, endorsed, permitted, encouraged, aided, or assisted in committing a violation or committed a violation;

    i. To endorse means having prior knowledge the misconduct was reasonably likely to occur and failing to take reasonable preventive or corrective action; failing to attempt to stop known misconduct while it is occurring; and/or helping to plan, promote, or carry out the misconduct.
    ii. In determining whether an organization or its officers failed to take reasonable precautions, the University may take into account the repeated occurrence of other relevant incidents involving the organization;
    iii. A pattern of individual violations occurs without appropriate accountability action by the student organization;

    c. One or more members or alumni permitted, encouraged, aided, or assisted, in committing a violation, including:

    i. The violation was committed as part of an activity or assignment supported by the organization and/or approved by the local, regional, or national leadership;
    ii. The violation was committed by members attending a function as representatives of the University, including, but not limited to, competitions, conferences, and conventions;
    iii. Members, officers, or alumni committed a violation in the name of the organization.

    6. Student organizations are also expected to observe the policies and rules established by the Leadership, Service and Civic Engagement, Fraternity and Sorority Life, Recreational Services, student governance organizations (USG, GPSG, IFC, PHC, MGC, NPHC, ARH), or an academic college/department/unit. Policies and Rules governing registered student organizations are posted in Article III sections A and B of this website.  Section A or B rules apply to every UI student organization, including sports clubs, and disciplinary sanctions will be imposed in the event of a policy or rule violation. 

  • II: Rules for Student Organizations

    II. Rules for Student Organizations

    The Office of Student Accountability has also established rules for student organizations. These rules are specified below:

    1. Hazing. In accordance with Iowa state law, hazing is defined as any intentional or reckless behavior, action, or situation, occurring with or without consent that endangers or creates risk of injury, mental or physical discomfort, hinders student engagement, harasses, embarrasses, and/or ridicules an individual. This includes assisting, approving (implicitly or explicitly), organizing, or otherwise participating in the prohibited behaviors,  for the purpose of initiation into, affiliation with, or as a condition for continued membership or a leadership role in any student organization, fraternity, sorority, or team recognized by the University of Iowa Student Government or by any other University sponsor or department.
    2. Funds retained in Student Organization Accounts. Disciplinary sanctions will be imposed if organizational funds are allocated in violation of University policies governing student organization accounts or if members failed to follow mandatory cash handling procedures.
    3. Alcohol. Organization members are prohibited from supplying alcohol to individuals outside the guidelines of the campus alcohol policy and/or policies regulating student organization social events.
    4. Illegal Drugs. Organization members are prohibited from supplying illegal drugs to members of their student organization or allowing the use or possession of illegal drugs at the organization’s events. Drugs include controlled substances, and substances that may be detrimental to health, even though not subject to state and federal laws.
    5. Misconduct on organizational property. Student organizations, which own or lease property are expected to undertake reasonable preventive measures to ensure that local, state, and federal laws are observed on its property. Criminal Conduct and Code of Student Life violations on organization property may result in the imposition of sanctions on the organization if preventive measures were unreasonable. Misconduct on organization property which violates the Code of Student Life may also result in sanctions if the organization failed to undertake reasonable preventive measures.
    6. Misconduct involving other student organizations. Student organization members are expected to respect the rights and privileges of other organizations and their members. Vandalism, harassment, and violence, for example, are strictly prohibited by the Code of Student Life. A student organization may be subject to disciplinary sanctions if the misconduct directed at the other organization was related directly or indirectly to organization affiliation, even if carried out by an individual member.  A student organization intentionally involved in the misconduct of another organization may be subject to sanctions as well.
    7. Failure to Comply with a University Directive. Executive officers and members of a student organization are expected to comply with a reasonable directive issued by any University employee acting in the performance of their duties. Failure to comply with a directive may be grounds for imposing sanctions on the organization.
    8.  Participation in Academic Misconduct. A student organization may be subject to disciplinary sanctions if one or more organization members aids or abets another member of their organization or as a benefit to another organization to violate Rule 1 of the Code of Student Life. Rule 1 prohibits cheating, plagiarism, and other forms of Academic Misconduct.
    9. Other Violative Conduct. A student organization may be subject to disciplinary sanctions if one or more organization members violates University regulations at an event sponsored by the organization or in the course of the organization’s affairs and the organization failed to exercise reasonable preventive measures. Sanctions may also be imposed on the organization if the activity of one or more members at the organization-sponsored event seriously threatened (a) any educational process or other legitimate function of the University or (b) the health or safety of any member of the academic community.
    10. Failure to Observe Rules/Policies. Failure on the part of the student organization to observe an internal organization rule, University policy, academic college guideline, or rule issued by a student governance organization is prohibited.

  • III: Reports

    III. Reports

    Allegations of a possible violation of this policy may be brought to the University’s attention by a police report, incident report, report by organization leadership, media account, or any other method to: 

    a. Leadership, Service, and Civic Engagement, Recreational Services,
    b. Office of the Dean of Students,
    c. Office of Student Accountability, or
    d. Other University offices, including the Office of Institutional Equity.

    Possible policy violations or reports can be referred for behavior that occurs both on and off campus. Additionally, any office, department, student organization, or individual (faculty, staff, student, or individual not affiliated with the University) may submit a report here.

    All such reports should be forwarded to the Office of Student Accountability. The Director of Student Accountability or their designee will review the initial report to determine how a case should proceed.

  • IV: Investigation

    IV. Investigation

    1. The Director of OSA may assign an investigator to investigate the alleged violations of University policies committed by student organizations. During the investigation, a representative(s) of the student organization will be notified of the allegations in writing and given an opportunity to meet with the investigator to explain the organization’s side of the incident prior to the issuance of the final investigative decision. The student organization representative(s) also has the opportunity to submit documents and other relevant evidence to the investigator and identify witnesses who may have relevant information.
    2. If a case is to proceed, a file will be created that will remain a part of the student organization’s permanent file in the Office of Student Accountability.
    3. Interim Measures: Pending the completion of an investigation and issuance of a report, a student organization may be subjected to any measure set forth in these student organization procedures, other than revoking the student organization’s registration, on an interim basis.

    a. The assigned investigator has the authority to impose suspension of certain activities as sanctions on an interim basis.  The Director of Student Accountability and/or the investigator will consult with the Director of Leadership and Engagement, the Director of Recreation Services, or their designees, as applicable, regarding the case and any interim sanctions.
    b. The Director of Student Accountability, Director of Leadership and Engagement, or the Director of Recreational Services, or their designee, has the authority to suspend all of an organization’s activities pending the outcome of the investigation if in their opinion the organization’s continued operation poses either:

    1. a continuing danger to persons or property or
    2. constitutes an ongoing threat of disruption to the academic process.

    c. Interim measure decisions will be based on evidence available at that time. In situations where an investigation will take an extended length of time, and when serious interim measures are imposed against a student organization (i.e., interim suspension), the interim measure(s) will be continuously reassessed by the investigators based on available information.
    d. A student organization may request that the investigator reconsider serious interim measures at any time.

    1. Within ten (10) University business days after an interim measure is imposed, a student organization may submit a written request for review and reconsideration of the interim measures.
    2. In situations where an investigation will take an extended length of time, and when interim suspension measures are imposed against a student organization, the interim measure(s) will be continuously reassessed by the investigators based on available information and involved parties will be updated.

    4. Criminal Charges: University disciplinary proceedings may be instituted against a student organization or student organization representative(s) charged with conduct that potentially violates both criminal laws and University policy, notwithstanding the fact that an investigation or court proceeding might be pending. University proceedings may occur before, during, or after the criminal court process.

    a. A student organization or student organization representative(s) charged with criminal misconduct will be considered responsible for violating University Code of Student Life expectations and rules and therefore subject to disciplinary sanctions if convicted in criminal court of conduct prohibited under the Code of Student Life.
    b. For the purposes of these procedures, a conviction includes a guilty plea, no-contest plea, jury verdict, judicial decision, or deferred judgment.
    c. Due to the less stringent standard of proof under these procedures, a student organization or student organization representative(s) charged but not convicted of a crime is still subject to University disciplinary action if found responsible of violating University policy.
    d. Findings or sanctions imposed under this policy shall not be subject to change even though criminal charges arising out of the same facts were dismissed, reduced, or resolved in favor of the responding student organization or student organization representative(s).

  • V: Resolution

    V. Resolution

    Adaptable Resolution Process:

    1. The Office of Student Accountability has the authority to impose sanctions if they conclude that Code of Student Life violations occurred and that sanctions are warranted by a full or partial investigation. When the investigator determines there has been a policy violation, and/ or the student organization acknowledges or admits that they engaged in the alleged behavior and cooperatively participates in the process, an Adaptable Resolution Process can be utilized.  

    2. While the Adaptable Resolution Process is typically available for Level 1 and 2 violations, the Director of OSA and the investigator will consider other circumstances for proceeding with an adaptable resolution that include: the overall safety and appropriateness to utilize this process, the complexity of the violation, the organization’s motivation and ability to participate, disciplinary history, and whether or not adequate resources exist to invest in the adaptable resolution (time, staff, etc.) as well as which form of resolution may be most successful for the student organization and the University.

    3. If Adaptable Resolution is applicable, the investigator will determine whether all parties and the University of Iowa are able to agree on responsibility, sanctions, and/or remedies. If so, the investigator implements the accepted finding that the student organization is in violation of University of Iowa policy and implements agreed-upon sanctions and/or remedies, in coordination with other appropriate administrator(s), as necessary.

    4. The Adaptable Resolution Process includes the following steps:

    a. The investigator and student organization representative(s) collaborate to co-create an adaptable resolution agreement for the incident.
    b. Before creating the adaptable resolution agreement, the investigator will consult with the Director of Leadership and Engagement or the Director of Recreational Services (or their designees) and, where applicable, the (inter)national / sponsoring organization for the local student organization/chapter, regarding the case and their sanction recommendations.
    c. The adaptable resolution agreement will be authored by the investigator, agreed upon by all parties, and signed by the student organization representative(s).
    d. Due to the nature of the adaptable resolution process, an appeal is not available after the agreement is signed by the responding student organization representative(s).  

    Administrative Resolution Process:

    When it has been determined, via the Adaptable Resolution Process, that a Level 3 violation(s) was committed and that suspension of University registration of the organization may be warranted (i.e. typically for Level 3 violations or resulting from progressive discipline), the case will be referred to the Director of the Office of Student Accountability for Administrative Resolution.   

    a. In these instances, the sanctions will be determined by the Director of the Office of Student Accountability who will consult with the Director of Leadership and Engagement or the Director of Recreational Services, (or their designee) as applicable and, where applicable, the (inter)national / sponsoring organization for the local student organization/chapter, regarding the case and their sanction recommendations.
    b. The student organization representative(s) will have ten (10) business days after receipt of the notice of a decision to request an appeal to the Director of the Office of Student Accountability.

    Formal Process:

    1. The Office of Student Accountability has the authority to impose sanctions if they conclude (via responding party admission or investigation) that the Code of Student Life was violated and that sanctions are warranted.

    a. An investigator may proceed with an accountability process if the student organization representative fails to respond to the notice letter or fails to attend their scheduled investigation meeting.

    2. If the investigator determines there has been a Level 1 or 2 policy violation, sanctions can be applied by the investigator.   When sanctioning, Office of Student Accountability staff will consult with the Director of Leadership and Engagement, the Director of Recreational Services, (or their designee, as applicable) and, where applicable, the (inter)national / sponsoring organization for the local student organization/chapter, regarding the case and their sanction recommendations.

    3. If the investigator determines there have been level 3 violation(s), the case will be referred to the Director of Student Accountability for resolution. The report prepared by the investigator may include a list of recommended sanctions.

    a. The Director of the Office of Student Accountability will schedule a resolution meeting with the student organization representative(s) following the completion of the investigation.
    b. The Director of the Office of Student Accountability or their designee may issue a decision if the student organization representative fails to respond to the notice letter or fails to attend their scheduled investigation meeting.

    4. The student organization representative(s) will have ten (10) business days after receipt of the notice of a decision to request an appeal to the Director of Leadership and Engagement, or the Director of Recreational Services, as applicable.

    University of Iowa Office of Student Accountability

    Student Organization Accountability Process Tiers

     

    Level 1

    Level 2

    Level 3

     

     

    Level Description

     

    Low-level violations and/or individual member violations

     

    Mid-level violations which are Code of Student Life and/or risk management violations

     

    High-level violations which are Code of Student Life and/or risk management violations

     

     

     

     

    Violation Examples

     

    Recruitment infractions

    Mid-level alcohol violations (hard alcohol, common source, distribution to minors, etc.)

     

    Hazing

    Minor alcohol infractions

    Unregistered social events

    Sexual Misconduct

    Individual member housing lease/contract violations

    Failure to Comply with a University Directive

    Harassment

    Fraternity/Sorority council violations

    Aiding or Abetting Academic Misconduct

    High-level alcohol (distribution, etc.)

    Organization expectations or bylaws

    Theft

    High-level drugs (distribution, manufacture, etc.)

    Failure on the part of the organization to observe an internal organization rule, University policy, academic college guideline


    Funds retained in Student Organization Accounts

    Disorderly conduct, Misconduct on organizational property

    Endangerment

    Drugs (possession, use, etc.)

    Responsible Action: Organizations who proactively report a potential Level 3 violation(s) may be considered for Level 2 adjudication (partnership process).

    Providing False Information to officials

    Harassment

    Offensive Behavior

    Property Misuse

    Violating a Rule of the University

     

     

    Adjudication Process

     

    Governing council judicial process, organization judicial boards or other internal judicial process.

    Adaptable Resolution Process - Organization investigation and development of outcomes with FSL/Rec Services (or other entity) and OSA.

     

    Case investigation and adjudication by OSA and/or appropriate officials.

     

  • VI: Sanctions

    VI. Sanctions

    When it has been determined that one or more University policies have been violated, one or more sanctions may be imposed. Student organizations that fail to comply with a sanction in a timely manner are subject to additional disciplinary action, which may include loss of registration until compliance is achieved.

    The following is a non-exhaustive list of potential sanctions that may be utilized individually or in combination:

    1. Disciplinary Reprimand: A written warning to the student organization explaining that the violation of university policy requires an official record to be kept in the Office of Student Accountability. A subsequent University policy violation following a Disciplinary Reprimand may result in the imposition of more serious sanctions.

    2. Educational Program. A student organization may be required to provide an identified service or participate in a particular program, receive specific instruction, or complete a designated assignment. The student organization is responsible for any related expenses, including expenses for education, counseling, and/or services.

    3. Organization Leadership Development Opportunity.  Student organization leaders may be required to participate in additional leadership development or educational opportunities intended to build leaders capable of guiding culture change and providing overall leadership to their organization or enhance specific knowledge on policy or related issues. 

    4. Attainment of Standards. A student organization or student organization representative(s) may be required to attain a specific standard(s) over the course of a designated period of time. Examples of these standards include, but are not limited to: organizational grade point average, organizational arrest and citation rate, organizational member retention, organizational member certifications/trainings.

    5. Disciplinary Probation: A written acknowledgement of a violation of university policy.  The student organization may remain eligible for registration as a student organization at the university only on the condition that the organization complies with university policies including the Code of Student Life, and any other sanctions or restrictions on privileges, for a specified amount of time.

    6. Restitution: A student organization may be assessed reasonable expenses related to the misconduct. This may include, but is not limited to, the following: the repair/replacement cost for damage to University property.

    7. Denial of Privileges: A student organization may be denied access to certain University privileges for a definite or indefinite period of time. Such sanctions may include, but are not limited to, the following: prohibitions on University space usage, prohibition from receiving and/or expending funds, suspension to participate in certain student organization and/or University sponsored activities.

    8. Loss of Registration: A student organization may be involuntarily separated from the University for a specified period of time or permanently. Conditions for a return may be specified as needed.

    Sanctions will vary based upon the facts and circumstances of any specific offense. Sanctions are usually progressive in nature and include the probability of more severe disciplinary sanctions if the student organization or student organization representative(s) are found to violate the same or any other University policies. In some circumstances, the Executive Director of the IMU or Director of Recreational Services may elect to defer a sanction. A deferred suspension, for example, means that the sanction does not go into effect as long as the student organization complies with all requirements during the interim period. In those cases where the student organization completes all expectations during the interim period, the student organization’s record will show that the sanction was never imposed.
    Organization Leadership Development Opportunity.  Student organization leaders may be required to participate in additional leadership development or educational opportunities intended to build leaders capable of guiding culture change and providing overall leadership to their organization or enhance specific knowledge on policy or related issues. 

    In the event that a student organization or student organization representative(s) fail to comply with a sanction and the Director of Student Accountability has decided to impose a suspension, the student organization will be notified of the apparent failure to comply and of the Director’s intent to suspend, and provided an opportunity to meet personally with the Director and explain the circumstances prior to a final decision.

  • VII: Appeals

    VII. Appeals

    The responding student organization may appeal the decision by filing a written notice of appeal within ten (10) University business days following the receipt of the decision. The notice of appeal shall be filed with the Office of the Dean of Students.

     Grounds for appeal:

    1. There was significant procedural error that materially affected the outcome (e.g., lack of notice, opportunity to be heard, or opportunity to challenge information);
    2. The decision was not supported by substantial evidence when viewed as a whole;
    3. The decision amounted to misapplication of these rules;
    4. The sanction imposed was not appropriate in light of the policy violation(s);
    5. New, substantial evidence, not reasonably available at the time of the investigation or sanctioning, could materially change the decision.

    Process for appeal:

    1. The Director of Student Accountability will send an acknowledgement of receipt of the appeal to the student organization, generally within two (2) University business days.
    2. The Director of Student Accountability will typically transmit the student organization’s appeal and the record to the appeal officer who shall be the Director, Leadership and Engagement or Director of Recreational Services, as applicable, in a timely manner. The Director of Student Accountability will determine another suitable appellate officer should a conflict of interest be present with the Director, Leadership and Engagement or Director of Recreational Service. Sanctions imposed by the investigator or Director of Student Accountability will remain in effect while the appeal is being considered, unless otherwise noted.
    3. The appeal officer will review the student organization’s written appeal and the case record, which includes the investigation report, investigator notes and evidence collected. The appeal officer will not meet with the student or witnesses, or engage in further investigation with respect to the allegations.
    4. The appeal officer will transmit a written decision on the appeal to the Director of Student Accountability within ten (10) University business days from when the record was received by the appeal officer. The Director will circulate the decision on appeal within two (2) University business days after receipt of the decision.
    5. The decision made by the Director, Leadership and Engagement or Director of Recreational Services on the appeal is the final university decision on the matter. The student organization may appeal the University’s final decision to the Board of Regents, State of Iowa, subject to its policies, procedures, and deadlines.  The University’s final decision letter will provide a hyper-link to the appeal procedures for the Board of Regents. Any sanctions imposed will remain in effect until the Board of Regents appeal process has been completed.


Registration of Student Automobiles

All students who operate, maintain, or own any motor vehicle on university property must register the vehicle within 48 hours of their initial operation of the vehicle on campus. Students can register their vehicles by using the online portal on the Parking & Transportation web site at http://transportation.uiowa.edu/. Alternatively, students can visit either of the Parking and Transportation offices located in the IMU Parking Ramp and the West Campus Transportation Center. See The University of Iowa Motor Vehicle and Parking Regulations, located on the Parking and Transportation website, for complete information.


Lost & Found

The University Lost and Found Office is located on the southwest side of University Capitol Centre (200 S. Capitol Street) on the lower level.

Hours: Monday and Tuesday 10:30 AM-6:30 PM; 
Wednesday-Friday 9:00 AM-5:00 PM
Closed weekends and University holidays
Phone: 319-384-2797
E-mail: lost@uiowa.edu

Mailing address:

Lost and Found
809 UCC
Iowa City, IA 52242

To report a lost item, please contact us by phone or e-mail. Describe the item in detail. Be sure to leave your name and phone number. Please allow at least 2-3 days for us to contact you. This may allow time for the lost item to arrive at our facility.

If you have found an item and wish to turn it into the Lost and Found, our hours are listed above. You may also send items to us via Campus Mai


Reporting Correct Residential Address and E-mail Address

Every student is required to report their correct residential address at the time of registration each semester or session. Address changes must be submitted on MyUI or in person at the Office of the Registrar (Registrar Service Center, 17 Calvin Hall).  Any change of residence made during the semester or session must be reported within three days. Failure or refusal to comply with this regulation may result in restriction of registration. Reporting erroneous addresses is prohibited by the Code of Student Life and may result in disciplinary sanctions in addition to restriction of registration.

The current address must be reported to the University Registrar and must be the student's actual residing address. Reporting the parent's address is not acceptable unless the student is currently living at the parent's address or is enrolled in a study abroad program. Students interested in routing U-bills to the parent's address may do so on-line at https://myui.uiowa.edu by clicking on "Student Information" then "University Bill". Routing home a U-bill does not change the student's local address and does not satisfy the requirement to provide the Registrar with a current residential address.

With regard to electronic addresses, official correspondence from the University is regularly sent to students by electronic mail.  Every student is considered to be on notice of the information contained in official University e-mail messages sent to the student's official e-mail address. In order to remain enrolled, every student must register an e-mail address with the University of Iowa and maintain their account so that all official University e-mail is deliverable.  In composing messages, students are expected to comply with all of the University’s information technology policies, available at http://cio.uiowa.edu/Policy/. 

All students are assigned an official University email alias (firstname-lastname@uiowa.edu), hereafter referred to as the official University email address, and provided a University of Iowa target email account.  All official University e-mail is sent to this official University email address.  E-mail accounts with the University of Iowa are created through My UI at https://myui.uiowa.edu by clicking on "Student Information," then "My Email," and "Request Email Account.”  A student can update their target address via MyUI at https://myui.uiowa.edu by clicking on "Student Information," then "My Email," and "Update Email Routing Address.”  For more information about e-mail and e-mail support see the URL http://its.uiowa.edu/office365email

While it is not recommended, a student may change their routing address through MyUI by clicking on "Student Information," then "My Email," and "Update Email Routing Address."  (In other words, a student may elect to route e-mail addressed to their official University e-mail address to an account such as Gmail or Yahoo)  Students who route their e-mail to another e-mail address do so at their own risk and are responsible for all information, including attachments, sent to any other e-mail account.  The University is not responsible for e-mail routed to any other e-mail address or for any difficulties that may occur in the proper or timely transmission or access of e-mail routed to any unofficial email address.  A student’s failure to receive or read in a timely manner official University communications sent to the student’s official e-mail address does not absolve the student of the responsibility to read and comply with the content of the official communication.  Faculty may legitimately assume that a student’s official University e-mail address, as available on class rosters, is a valid mechanism for communicating with a student and may use e-mail for communicating with students registered in their classes. 


Mandatory Student Fees Policy

Mandatory Student Fees at the University of Iowa 

Students enrolled at the University of Iowa are assessed tuition based on their program of study. Most students are also assessed mandatory fees that help pay for the facilities and services available to them. Mandatory fees are not based on an individual’s use of facilities or services. The list below describes the various mandatory fees in effect for UI students.  The complete version of the mandatory fee policy, which includes a list of exempted categories, can be found at: https://registrar.uiowa.edu/mandatory-fees

The technology fee supports instructional computing demands by providing financial support to improve the quality and quantity of student computing resources (facilities, equipment, and services) and library and other information sources.

The student health service fee is assessed to students enrolled for more than four (4) semester hours in a session. This fee allows a student access to the SHS to see a doctor with no office visit charge as many times during the semester as they need. This fee also covers health promotion services including fitness assessments, nutrition counseling, etcPatients who have been assessed the student health fee still must pay for lab tests, supplies, physicals, immunizations, procedures (such as wart removal) and other costs.

The student activity, student services, and student union fees provide funding to support the multitude of activities (student organizations/activities; partnership of student governments) and services (Cambus/Bionic Bus; Daily Iowan) available to UI students, both on and off campus.

The building fee contributes to funding for certain construction projects on the UI campus.

The arts and cultural events fee supports cultural events and performances on campus that are free to students. The fee also subsidizes some of the cost of student admission to any ticketed event produced by the Division of Performing Arts. (Students are admitted at a reduced price.)

The recreation fee supports the operation and maintenance of Recreational Services facilities on the UI campus, including the new Campus Recreation and Wellness Center (CRWC), as well as programmatic offerings of Recreational Services. The establishment of the fee was essential for the construction of the CRWC and is used to help pay the debt service on the facility. Beginning with the fall 2010 semester, a Recreational Services membership is required to access all recreation facilities on campus, including the CRWC, Field House, Hawkeye Tennis & Recreation Complex (HTRC), Fitness East and Recreation Building. A Recreational Services membership is included in the recreation fee. Once inside the facilities, most activities, including swimming, fitness, rock climbing, racquetball, basketball, volleyball, and Group Exercise classes are included with the membership. Beyond access to all recreation facilities on campus, members also receive discounts on program registration (including Lesson Programs, Rowing, Tennis Programs, Aquatics and Adventure Trips), and reduced tennis court fees.

The career services fee is assessed to undergraduate UI students. The University of Iowa Pomerantz Career Center is a world-class facility with a national reputation for excellence. The Center directly serves more than 20,000 students from the Henry B. Tippie College of Business, the College of Engineering, and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The services provided are centralized and comprehensive. The administration of the Center is organized into seven distinct but integrated areas. For more information, visit Career Center web site at http://www.careers.uiowa.edu/overview.html.

The professional enhancement fee is charged to all enrolled students enrolled in the Graduate College. The Graduate College offers many professional enhancement opportunities, including: Professional Development Workshops/Programs; Scholarly Integrity; Sponsored Programs – Grant Writing; and the Jakobsen Conference/Forum.

Appeal Process

A student who will not be on campus during the entire session may apply for a mandatory fee waiver.  A student eligible for a mandatory fee exemption must submit an appeal form to the Office of the University Registrar. The form is posted at https://registrar.uiowa.edu/mandatory-fees. Appeal requests will not be accepted after the last day of classes of the academic term.

Student Government Activity Fee Refund/Reallocation

Each semester students pay a Student Activity Fee. A portion of the Student Activity Fee is allocated to General Student Organizations. The University has determined that its mission is served if students have the means to engage in dynamic discussions of philosophical, religious, scientific, social and political subjects in their extracurricular campus life.

Registered students may request a refund or reallocate the portion of the fee allocated to General Student Organizations.  A request for a refund will be credited on the student's University Bill each semester, while a request for reallocation will be designated to a campus-wide service chosen each year by the student governments. To avoid automatic allocation for the 2011-12 academic year, request forms must be submitted to the University Billing Office, Room 5 Calvin Hall no later than September 23. Requests for a one semester refund/reallocation will not be allowed except for new students registering for second semester only who submit a request form by February 14.  Additional information is available from the University of Iowa Student Government, 260 IMU, 335-3859.


Voter Registration

Voter Registration

To register to vote, a voter registration form must be completed and delivered or mailed to the County Auditor’s office. Forms are available at the Johnson County Auditor’s office (County Administration Building). Voter registration forms and information about local election rules (including registration deadlines) are available on the Internet at the following link:

http://www.johnson-county.com/auditor/voter/vrfrmins.htm


Picture Student Identification

University policy requires that official student identification cards include a picture. A student registered for course work conducted at an off-campus site may apply for a no-picture identification card for library use only. For more information about student identification cards, contact the ID Card Office, 2700 University Capitol Centre.


Graduation Rate

The following information is distributed to students as required by the Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act of 1990.

Historically, more than 70 percent of students entering directly from high school receive a baccalaureate degree from The University of Iowa within the six-year completion period established by the Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act.

The most recent graduation rate available is calculated using the number of students enrolled full-time for the first time at The University of Iowa in the Fall Semester of 2014. Of these 4,347 students, 72.3% had graduated six years later (by August of 2020). More than half (53.6%) graduated within the four-year period. The 2014 cohort graduation rate would be even higher if it included transfer students, who were presumably in good academic standing when they transferred.


Critical MASS

Students found responsible for a violation of the Code of Student Life may be placed on Disciplinary Reprimand or Disciplinary Probation for a specified period of time. Anecdotal experience is that students without a good support system will often will have additional Code violations during the probation period, especially first-year students. These violations could lead to a suspension of a student for at least one semester. To assist students, the Critical Mentoring and Student Support program (Critical MASS) has been established with UI faculty, staff, and graduate students serving in the mentor role. It is expected that Mentors have at least one year with the University of Iowa.

Purposeful mentorship

Critical MASS mentors provide support and a faculty/staff/graduate student connection for referred students.

Goals of the Critical Mass program

  • To provide a connection between referred students and a knowledgeable, caring faculty or staff member on campus.

  • Critical MASS3To create a “check-in” system meant to increase accountability for personal behavior on the student’s part.

  • To implement an early intervention system that will facilitate referrals for needed academic and other support services.

This program is assessed by measuring reductions in second violations of the Code of Student Life.

Meeting with the student

A Critical MASS mentor will be asked to meet regularly (4 times) with an assigned mentee. This check-in should be in person (about sixty minutes), but email or phone check-ins at other times can be used. The purpose of the check-in is to see how the student is doing, monitor their progress toward their substance use goals (e.g., not using alcohol at all, or using moderately, depending on the student and the situation), and provide them with information about additional resources on campus, if needed.

Referrals

As a mentor meets with a student, the mentor will certainly find that the student may benefit from connection with other services on campus, such as the University Counseling Service, Student Health Service, or academic support services, such as a writing center, a tutor, or academic advising. A list of common resources will be provided to mentor. If a mentor becomes concerned about a student’s safety or well-being, please contact the Office of the Dean of Students.

What’s expected of Critical MASS mentors

All Critical MASS mentors will be asked to attend an annual training session and to provide regular updates to the Office of the Dean of Students. Mentors will meet with their mentee a total of four times over three to four months. These updates can be brief utilizing the online template with the main focus on anything requiring action by the Dean of Students. The average time committment is 6-8 hours total.

A note about boundaries

Faculty, staff, and graduate students are volunteering to take on this role because they care about students and their success. The mentor’s role as a Critical MASS mentor is to provide support and connect students with appropriate resources. However, it is the student’s responsibility to take action. A mentor is not expected to make calls or accompany students to appointments, etc. While, mentors are certainly welcome to form a more personal relationship with your student(s)—for instance, having your meeting over lunch—it is not required. Mentors are expected to understand and uphold FERPA guidelines.

What’s expected of the student

The student should contact the mentor within three days of notification and meet in person within two weeks of notification. The student is expected to set up each meeting and attend each meeting. If a student is unable to attend a meeting there should be communication with the mentor and a meeting rescheduled. Failure to attend a meeting may result in further Code of Student Life violations.

Reflections from Mentees:

  • "It was a very informative program and I believe it should be offered to more than just the students who get in trouble." 2015-2016 Mentee
  • "I enjoyed this program. I liked how my mentor was not judgmental and was willing to help me if I did indeed need it. I think this program is beneficial." 2014-2015 Mentee
  • "[The program] didn't just focus on what you did, but helped find clubs and programs that will help with my future career option(s)." 2013-14 Mentee
  • "My mentor was great.  We never had a problem scheduling a time or place to meet.  I didn't dread the meetings like I thought I would." 2013-14 Mentee
  • “I learned there are great people here at the University of Iowa that I can go to if I need help.” 2012-13 Mentee
  • “Developing a good relationship with my mentor really made things easy and I can now contact her whenever I need guidance or someone to talk to.” 2011-12 Mentee

Reflections from Mentors:

  • "...this program has reminded me to view situations from the perspective of the individual who is experiencing the situation. Everyone will see things differently, and although one thing may seem like a cut-anddry decision to make for someone, it can be totally different for someone else." 2015-2016 Mentor
  • "Connect about more than just what the student is there for. From my experience, my student seemed intimidated at first, but when I was able to talk about basketball, rapport started to build. We both enjoyed the conversation around this topic so much that our second appointment took place in the Fieldhouse so we could shoot baskets. I felt like this really helped my mentee open up to me and feel more comfortable." 2014-2015 Mentor
  • "Students have a lot going on in their lives besides school work. I know this, but it never hurts to be reminded that students are complicated human beings just like the rest of us and being a student is only one facet of their life." 2013-14 Mentor
  • “This experience has helped me appreciate the difficulties students have today when adapting to a new environment. It also helps me have a greater appreciation of our mission of helping students learn and become better citizens” 2011-12 Mentor
  • “It’s not always easy to have difficult conversations, but my experience with CMASS has certainly improved my ability to listen, empathize, and advise.” 2011-12 Mentor

Federal Student Aid Penalties for Illegal Drug Convictions

According to an act of Congress, students convicted in court of illegal drug violation are not eligible to receive federal financial assistance.  Federal assistance includes grants, loans, and work assistance otherwise provided to eligible college students under Title IV of the Higher Education Act.  The period of non-eligibility begins on the date of the conviction and remains in effect until the student has met the rehabilitation requirements as specified in Public Law 105-244, Title IV, Part G, Section 483(f)(1)(r)(1).

The prohibition on federal aid applies to any student who has been convicted of any offense under any Federal or State law involving the possession or sale of a controlled substance as defined by section 102(6) of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 802(6)). Laws regulating distilled spirits, wine, and malt beverages are not included within the definition of “controlled substance.” 

For information on the health effects of illegal drugs, the criminal penalties for federal law violations, and state criminal penalties, refer to the tables in Part VI of the Dean of Students' policy website index.


Annual Reports

Each year the Office of Student Accountability produces an annual report.

2020-2021 Annual Report

2019-2020 Annual Report

2018-2019 Annual Report

2017-2018 Annual Report

2016-2017 Annual Report

2015-2016 Annual Report

2014-2015 Annual Report

2013-2014 Annual Report

2012-2013 Annual Report

2011-2012 Annual Report

2010-2011 Annual Report

2009-2010 Annual Report

Questions regarding the Annual Report should be directed to the Office of Student Accountability at 203 Iowa Memorial Union or 319-335-1527.


Dean Clearance Letters

The Office of Student Accountability (OSA) provides certification or clearance letters upon request to undergraduate students needing verification of whether they have been subject to University disciplinary action. Dean clearance letters may be necessary for students wishing to transfer from the University of Iowa to another institution, applying to a graduate or professional school, or requested by a place of employment, study abroad office, law board examiners, or the United States military. Often times, the form is created by the institution or organization that requires the verification. Forms should be dropped off or sent to the Office of Student Accountability for processing. OSA staff will fill out the form and can mail it to you to deliver to the other institution. In some cases, the letter may be sent directly to the other institution. If no form is provided to you by the institution to which you are applying, the Office of Student Accountability may be able to provide a clearance letter on DOS letterhead and mail it directly to the institution.

In all cases, it is the responsibility of the applicant to determine which forms are required by the institution to complete the application process. Applicants should contact the Office of Student Accountability well in advance of the deadline in order to avoid your application being rejected for lack of timeliness.

Information for Undergraduates Transferring to Another Institution

  • Step 1. If you have a form, read the form carefully to see if there is a question about academic credentials.
    • If the form is a Common Application Form or a form requiring verification of your academic credentials, the form first needs to be filled out by your academic college (such as Business, Engineering, or the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences). Instruct your academic college to fill out their portion and route the form to the Office of Student Accountability (203 IMU) to be filled out and mailed.
    • If the form does not have a question about academic credentials, bring the form directly to the Office of Student Accountability (203 IMU).
  • Step 2. Authorize UI staff to release your information to the institution.
    • If you are using the form provided by the institution to which you are applying, look for the waiver question. Sign the waiver on the form which allows the Office of Student Accountability to release information regarding your record while a student at the University of Iowa.
  • Step 3. Help us track your letter. When you drop off the form at the Office of Student Accountability or your academic college, provide an additional sheet listing:
    • Your name and University ID number
    • The fax number or address of the institution where the form should be sent
  • If the institution to which you are applying requires a clearance letter from the Office of Student Accountability but does not use a standard form, send an email to dos-accountability@uiowa.edu requesting a Dean Clearance letter. Include in your email:
    • Your name and University ID number
    • Name of the college to which you are applying
    • Address or fax number where the letter should be sent
    • Any additional information requested by the college
  • Anticipate 7-10 business days to process.

Information for Applicants for Graduate/Professional School, Places of Employment, Study Abroad Office, Law Board Examiners, Military

  • Step 1. If you have a form, read the form carefully to see if there is a question about academic credentials.
    • If the form requires verification of your academic credentials, the form first needs to be filled out by your academic college (such as Business, Engineering, or the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences). Instruct your academic college to fill out their portion and route the form to the Office of Student Accountability (203 IMU) to be filled out and mailed.
    • If the form does not have a question about academic credentials, bring the form directly to the Office of Student Accountability (203 IMU).
  • Step 2. Authorize UI staff to release your information to the institution
    • If you are using the form provided by the institution to which you are applying, look for the waiver question. Sign the waiver on the form which allows the Office of Student Accountability to release information regarding your record while a student at the University of Iowa.
  • Step 3. Help us track your letter. When you drop off the form at the Office of Student Accountability or your academic college, provide an additional sheet listing:
    • Your name and University ID number
    • The fax number or address of the institution where the form should be sent
  • If the institution to which you are applying requires a clearance letter from the Office of Student Accountability but does not use a standard form, send an email to dos-accountability@uiowa.edu requesting a Dean Clearance letter. Include in your email:
    • Your name and University ID number
    • Name of the college to which you are applying
    • Address or fax number where the letter should be sent
    • Any additional information requested by the college
  • Anticipate 7-10 business days to process.

Preferred First Name Policy

Scope

This policy applies to all faculty, staff, and students of the University of Iowa. 

Policy Statement

The University of Iowa recognizes that faculty, staff, and students may use names other than their legal names to identify themselves. Except when an individual’s legal first name is required by law, policy, or business needs, individuals may choose to be identified in some university systems by the preferred first name that they have designated in accordance with this policy.

Allowable Name Formats

Many members of the UI community use a first name that differs from their legal first name. Allowable name formats include (but are not limited to):

  • A shortened derivative of a name (e.g, “Sue” for “Susan”)
  • A middle name instead of a first name
  • First and middle initials (e.g., “A.J.” for “Andrew John”)
  • An anglicized name (e.g, “Peter” instead of “Xingyu”)
  • A name that better represents the individual’s gender identity
  • A name to which the individual is in the process of legally changing

The university will not accept a preferred first name that is vulgar or offensive, obscene, fanciful, or creates confusion of the individual with another person.

Procedures

Persons who specify a preferred first name that is different from their legal first name agree that the designated name is, or will be, truly used to identify themselves.

The use of a preferred first name cannot be for the purpose of misrepresentation and must otherwise comply with UI policies, including but not limited to the Code of Student Life. The Office of Student Accountability will determine if a student’s preferred first name is appropriate under these criteria.  Human Resources will determine if an employee’s preferred first name is appropriate.

University Issued Identification Cards

Individuals who have opted in for broad usage of a preferred first name in university systems will have their preferred full name printed on the front of their university ID card and their standard name on the back of the ID card.  University of Iowa photo ID cards are issued for the purpose of university business only and should not be considered government issued identification for purposes such as air travel.

Faculty, staff, or students who replace an existing card with one displaying their preferred first name, will be charged a replacement fee to have a new card issued.

Systems and Processes

The University of Iowa utilizes multiple systems to manage its operations and processes. Where appropriate, university systems will be modified to display only the preferred first name. Instances in which a legal first name is required include, but are not limited to, financial aid forms, tax forms, university transcripts, and health records.

Faculty, staff, and students may enter their preferred first name at any time in one of the main enterprise systems (MyUI or Employee Self Service).  Other university systems that are dependent on data from these enterprise systems will be refreshed based on business processes and may take up to several business days for updated preferred first names to be reflected in all systems.

Definitions

Preferred first name - An alternative to the individual’s legal first name.  Entered by the individual in MyUI or Employee Self Service.  Faculty, staff, and students who enter a preferred first name can select between two usage options in UI systems:  limited use and broad use (see “Usage Options” in the definitions below).

Preferred full name – If an individual enters a preferred first name, the preferred full name is the preferred first name plus standard last name.

Legal name – A person’s legal name as it appears on official governmental documents such as licenses, passports, and tax forms.

Standard name – For employees, including student employees, standard name should be the same as legal name.  For students, standard name is also used on University Bills, financial aid documents, and most communications on campus. 

Official Student Records name - Official Student Records Name is used by the Office of the Registrar on official documents. It will appear on transcripts, diplomas, and any official verification letters.

Usage Options – limited and broad usage.

 

Usage Options

University of Iowa System

Limited

Broad

MAUI, Canvas, and ICON (for instructors and advisors)

Standard Name and Preferred Name

Standard Name and Preferred Name

ePersonnel file

Standard Name and Preferred Name

Standard Name and Preferred Name

Publicly-visible online directory

Standard Name

Preferred Name

Name that accompanies your UI email address

Standard Name

Preferred Name

University email address (first-last@uiowa.edu)

standardfirst-standardlast@uiowa.edu

standardfirst-standardlast@uiowa.edu

HawkID

Generated based on Standard Name

Generated based on Standard Name

University ID cards

Standard Name on front and back

Preferred Name on front, Standard Name on back

Human Resources systems, such as Payroll and Benefits

Standard Name

Standard Name

Systems used by other campus departments and units

Standard Name

Preferred Name,
unless the system requires
Standard  Name

Sanctions

The University of Iowa will handle reports of misuse and abuse of both preferred first names and legal first names in accordance with existing policies and procedures issued by appropriate authorities. Depending on the individual and circumstances involved, this could include the offices of Human Resources, Office of Student Accountability, General Counsel, Provost, Student Life and/or appropriate law enforcement agencies.

The university also reserves the right to remove preferred first names that are deemed misrepresentative and suspend the individual’s privilege to update their preferred first name.

 


Department of Public Safety

Please see https://police.uiowa.edu/crime-reporting/campus-security-act


Safety & Respect

Please see http://www.uiowa.edu/homepage/safety/index.html


Controlled Substances - Uses & Effects

Please see https://dos.uiowa.edu/assets/tablea.pdf


Federal Tracking Penalties - Marijuana and Penalties for Possession

Please see https://dos.uiowa.edu/assets/tableb.pdf


Penalties under Iowa Law for Manufacturing, Delivering, Possessing with the Intent to Deliver a Controlled Substance, a Counterfeit Substance or a Simulated Controlled Substance

Please see https://dos.uiowa.edu/assets/tableC1.pdf


Summary of Penalties for Various Offense Categories

Please see https://dos.uiowa.edu/assets/tabled.pdf


University Events Committee Policies, Procedures, & Guidelines

A. Description and authority

The University Events Committee (UEC) as outlined in V-28 and V-35.6 of the University Operations Manual and established by the 2017 Task Force on Outdoor Space (UEC formerly referenced as Campus Events Committee – Outdoor Space) reviews, approves or denies, schedules, and coordinates on and off-campus events at the University of Iowa.

Event policies and processes within UEC purview are defined below and outlined in this policy.  

The University Events Committee:

1. Assists in planning events when arrangements are necessary to maintain the orderly processes of the University, see Operations Manual V-28.

2. Reviews, schedules, approves, adjusts, or denies events which occur in university-controlled outdoor spaces (outdoor locations listed below)

3. Meets and corresponds with event sponsors and organizers as necessary.

4. Provides event sponsors and organizers information related to university policies and processes, City of Iowa City ordinances, and State of Iowa statutes.

5. Coordinates scheduled events with other requests and suggests alternate locations, dates, and/or times, if appropriate, and in accordance with First Amendment principles and facilities use policies.

6. Provides notification to university colleges, departments, or units regarding events, primarily through communication with building coordinators.

The Vice President for Student Life has granted administrative authority to the UEC to review, schedule, approve, or deny outdoor events as outlined in the 2017 Task Force on Outdoor Space Report and to assist in the organization of university events when arrangements are necessary to maintain the orderly processes of the university as outlined in V-28 of the University Operations Manual.

The UEC is administratively assigned within the Iowa Memorial (IMU) Events Services unit. IMU Event Services is responsible for scheduling all meetings of the University Events Committee.  Consistent with these policies and guidelines, the Committee receives requests from registered student organizations, UI colleges, departments, and units, and non-UI affiliated organizations for events to be scheduled.

IMU Event Services maintains minutes of UEC meetings, compiles the UEC calendar, and provides all records, including this document and any other operational procedures. Unless otherwise noted, this document and related operational policies were approved by the Vice President for Student Life.

IMU Event Services staff and advisors within Student Engagement & Campus Programs, Leadership, Service & Civic Engagement, Fraternity & Sorority Life Programs (FSL), and Multicultural & International Student Support & Engagement (MISSE) will assist registered student organizations with the planning and preparation of events.

For specific event-related policies and regulations, the University Events Committee consults a variety of university policy sources related to usage and approval. These include, but are not limited to:

1. University of Iowa Operations Manual 

a. V-28 - Campus Speakers and Programs

b. V-35 - Conditions of Use of University Facilities and Outdoor Spaces

2. Policies and Regulations Affecting Students Section III.II.

3. Division of Student Life Policies and Procedures

4. IMU Event Services Usage Policies

B. UEC composition & duties

1. The UEC Chair is the IMU Associate Director, Event Services & Facility Operations; and the IMU Facility Coordinator is the UEC Administrative Liaison. UEC membership is appointed by collegiate, department, unit, or shared governance leadership and is comprised of one representative from each of the following offices:

a. Leadership & Engagement

b. UI Facilities Management

c. UI Risk Management, Insurance, & Loss Prevention

d. UI Recreational Services

e. UI Parking & Transportation

f. UI Public Safety & University Police

g. UI Athletics

h. Undergraduate Student Government

i. Graduate & Professional Student Government

j. Campus Activities Board

k. UI Staff Council

l. Faculty Senate

m. UI Registrar (Classroom Scheduling)

n. Pentacrest Museums

o. Division of Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion

p. Multicultural & International Student Support & Engagement

2. UEC leadership may consult additional campus and community stakeholders when necessary. Representatives from the colleges, departments, units, and non-UI agencies listed below may be requested by the UEC Chair to attend meetings:

a. Academic colleges

b. Association of Campus Ministers

c. City of Iowa City

d. City of Coralville

e. Johnson County Ambulance Service

f. Office of the President

g. Office of the Executive Vice President & Provost

h. Office of the Vice President for Student Life

i. Office of the Dean of Students

j. Office of General Counsel

k. UI Emergency Management

l. UI Fire Safety

m. University of Iowa Diversity Councils

n. University of Iowa Healthcare & UIHC

3. The Chair will designate a person to conduct meetings in their absence.

4. Members of the University Events Committee are expected to attend all regularly scheduled meetings. When committee members cannot be present, they are expected to send a representative in their absence or otherwise address the issues, so as to ensure thorough consideration of events, without impeding the efficiency of the UEC.

5. The Committee follows a bi-weekly meeting schedule during the fall, spring, and summer academic sessions. The Committee will not convene during Thanksgiving, winter, or spring recesses.

C. UEC event approval processes

The University Events Committee has implemented the following guidelines and procedures for UI activities and events within its purview.

Event organizers are responsible for their events’ compliance with these guidelines and procedures, which apply to all activities and events sponsored by registered student organizations, UI colleges, departments, units, and non-UI affiliated organizations granted permission to use University facilities and spaces as described in this policy.

1. UEC approval not required. The scheduling of many activities on campus does not require University Events Committee approval. These activities include but are not limited to the following:

a. Registered student organization general meetings

b. Departmental/unit general meetings, receptions, gatherings

c. Conferences facilitated by the UI Center for Conferences

d. Summer camps, conferences, and institutes facilitated by UI Housing & Dining, Recreational Services, or Intercollegiate Athletics (unless requesting an outdoor space under the purview of UEC)

e. The distribution of literature or solicitation of signatures on petitions so long as the distribution or solicitation:

i. Adheres to the UI Casual Use Policy as defined in V-35 of the University Operations Manual.

ii. Does not obstruct pedestrian or vehicular traffic

iii. Does not require a table

iv. Permits the discussion and expression of all views

v. Does not obstruct or interfere with the normal operations of the institution

2. UEC approval required. UEC approval is required for all outdoor events not defined as casual use in the Conditions of Use of University Facilities and Outdoor Spaces, and/or when an outdoor event is large enough to require a designated area be reserved, and/or amplified sound is used. This includes but is not limited to:

a. Information tabling

b. 5K runs or races, especially that traverse UI property

c. Concerts

d. Exhibits

e. Fairs

f. Displays and promotions

g. Lectures or speeches

h. Installation of signage as approved by UEC

i. Uplighting or light projection as approved by UEC

j. Rallies

k. Carnival activities or arcade games

l. Scavenger hunt activities

m. Organized athletic activities not associated with UI Recreational Services or Intercollegiate Athletics

3. UEC approval and planning to maintain orderly processes of the University. UEC planning and facilitation is required when university administration determines it is appropriate for the maintenance of orderly processes of the University (see processes described in V-28 of the University Operations Manual).

 D. Outdoor reservation requests - guidelines & procedures

1. Reservation applications and approval process

a. Members or invited guests of the campus community may seek to reserve an outdoor campus area for use by submitting to IMU Event Services a written application (Outdoor Space Request) specifying the area desired, signed as appropriate by a campus community member or an authorized representative of the requesting group.

b. Registered student organization requests to reserve an outdoor space to host an information table should be submitted via an alternative form.

c. Colleges, departments, and units should complete the Outdoor Space Request form.

d. Applications must be submitted at least one week prior to an event. Large campus event applications submitted less than one month in advance of intended use might not allow sufficient time for all necessary arrangements to be made and therefore risk denials.

e. There is no charge for the use of the area unless special expenses or damages are incurred, which are charged to the group at actual cost.

f. IMU Event Services grants timely and reasonable applications in the order received and denies any application that does not conform with University regulations, these rules, or the law.

g. In reviewing an application, IMU Event Services considers whether the intended use may disturb or disrupt the University’s primary use of the facilities or regularly scheduled University programs events or activities in the areas.

h. Members of the campus community may reserve space on a tentative and conditional basis for a potential event prior to the event’s approval by the UEC.

i. The applicant, sponsoring organization, or event organizer may be required to appear before the UEC. See requests of applicants below.

j. The UEC will communicate with campus partners (e.g., building coordinators) regarding the use of specific spaces based on the type of event prior to approval being granted. Final approval will be communicated to applicants electronically.

2. Requests of applicants – An applicant reserving outdoor space may be asked for additional information about the event and support necessary for it, including parking, sanitation, health, safety, and security. The type of information that may be requested includes the following:

a. Data regarding the anticipated number of participants and spectators.

b. The adequacy of arrangements for crowd control, parking, sanitary facilities, and provision for protection of the health, safety, and security of persons and property.

c. The effect on normal pedestrian and vehicular traffic, educational operations, the availability of alternative facilities, and any other relevant factors that might adversely affect the legitimate interests of the University may be considered by IMU Event Services and the UEC.

d. IMU Event Services will consult with the UEC as deemed necessary in making decisions concerning requests.

e. Requests should be made using the online Outdoor Space Request form.

3. Imposition of reasonable conditions - The UEC may impose reasonable conditions on the use of the facilities. All events shall be conducted in full compliance with all applicable federal and state laws and city ordinances, and it is the responsibility of the group—and not the University--to obtain all applicable permits or licenses.

a. Limiting the time or duration of use when necessary for orderly conditions.

b. Requiring an organization to make adequate security arrangements for traffic or crowd control.

c. Requiring an organization follow amplified sound policy as outlined for each reserved location.

d. Requesting a deposit may be required from invited guests in such reasonable amount as may be determined sufficient by the UEC, after discussion with interested University-related groups, to ensure payment of any special expenses or damages incurred.

e. Prohibited and limited outdoor activities may be found in V-35.6 of the UI Operations Manual.

4. Approved applications - Approval, when granted, means that in the judgment of the Committee, the location, day, and time are appropriate to the purposes of the event as described to the Committee in the petition and/or the discussion. Should any question or conflict arise about the event, the UEC will be prepared to take an advocacy role for the occurrence of the event approved. Once an event is approved, the applicant will be notified via email. Organizations scheduling events are advised that materials and personnel costs incurred in relation to the events must be paid by the event organizers or sponsoring organizations; and a deposit for these costs may be required.

5. Denied applications - The UEC states in writing the reason for the denial of any application. A decision denying an application may be appealed to the Associate Dean of Students and Executive Director of the Iowa Memorial Union as outlined below in the appeal guidelines. No application may be denied for any reason that would deny Constitutionally protected rights of freedom of speech, expression, and assembly. Denial of approval for events means that in the judgment of the Committee, the event should not be held on the University of Iowa campus, or in any of its buildings, because of issues regarding time, manner, or place of the event as they were presented by the organization or individual to the Committee.

6. End of event - Events must end at the agreed time approved by the UEC. If the event does not end at the specified time, the group will receive a written warning for the first infraction. This reprimand will state that further infractions may result in prohibition of outdoor space reservation privileges for increasing durations according to the frequency and severity of the infractions.

a. Violations by registered student organizations will be reported to the Office of Student Accountability.

b. Violations by UI colleges, departments, or units will be reported to the appropriate university adjudicating authority for that specific college/department/unit.

c. Violations by non-UI affiliated organizations will result in the organization losing reservation privileges. The duration and severity of the loss of privileges will be proposed by a member of the UEC and voted on by a majority of UEC membership.

7. If an organization or individual persists in implementing an event that has been denied approval, sanctions against the sponsoring organization or event organizers may occur if complaints are made to the appropriate authority under University regulations, city ordinances, and/or state statutes. The University Events Committee is not a regulatory agency for complaints made. All complaints will be referred to:

a. Students - Office of Student Accountability

b. Staff - Employee & Labor Relations

c. Faculty - Office of the Provost

8. If the UEC’s determination, made in consultation with the UI Public Safety designee to the UEC, calls for implementation of special or additional security arrangements for an event with UI Public Safety, all overtime or extra personnel costs will be charged to the sponsoring organization or event organizers for securing their event. The sponsoring organization or event organizers are not responsible for securing a protest area or areas outside of their event.

9. Non-UI affiliated organizations may be required to complete additional agreements and insurance requirements as prescribed by the UI Business Office and UI Office of Risk Management, Insurance, and Loss Prevention.

10. Except for solicitations and corporate activations in Intercollegiate Athletics, all outdoor campus corporate activations and business solicitations will work directly with staff from the Division of Student Life and the Iowa Memorial Union.

11. The use of flags on the west side of the Pentacrest will not be permitted.

12. Registered student organizations may check out folding tables, A-frame signs, and tabling kits from the IMU Welcome Center on the day of their event.

13. Any costs for damages to an outdoor space or university facility from an event will be invoiced to the sponsor, organization, or event organizer by Iowa Memorial Union Event Services and credited to the appropriate campus department responsible for completing restoration and/or repairs. The University bears no liability for damage to or loss of event materials.

E. Locations requiring approval

1. Factors taken into consideration in determining the location of an event include its likely disruption to other scheduled events or to the ordinary activities of the University.

2. All organizations are required to follow the University of Iowa amplified sound policies when hosting events in campus outdoor locations. UEC will approve amplified sound for events only if it will not disrupt classroom instruction or the ordinary activities of the University.

3. The six most popular locations for outdoor events on the UI campus and their usage parameters are defined below. UEC may temporarily restrict use of any outdoor location to accommodate unforeseen requirements of a regular University program not anticipated by this policy.

a. Philip G. Hubbard Park

i. Hubbard Park is the green space west of Madison Street and north of Iowa Avenue; the space is bounded by the railroad tracks and the Iowa River on the west, the Iowa Memorial Union driveway to the north. Danforth Chapel, while located within Hubbard Park, is not subject to Hubbard Park’s usage parameters.

ii. Sale of Goods/Solicitation. All policies governing the sale of goods in the IMU and solicitation by student organizations are applicable to events and activities in Hubbard Park.

iii. Hubbard Park allows for structures and equipment, such as tents, tables, huts, kiosks, booths, vehicles, or similar structures, to be used as approved by the UEC in connection with an authorized group event or activity.

i.v Amplification Policy. Depending upon the time of the day and the day of the week in which the park is reserved, an eligible group may be restricted from using electronic sound amplification equipment.

b. Pentacrest

i. Area of the campus bounded by Clinton Street on the east, Washington Street on the south, Madison Street on the west and Jefferson Street on the north, and on which are located the Old Capitol, Macbride Hall, Schaeffer Hall, MacLean Hall, and Jessup Hall. The Pentacrest forms the core of the central campus, and the buildings thereon contain classrooms, laboratories, and faculty and administrative offices. The Old Capitol is a state historical monument.

ii. Hours of Use. Casual use of the Pentacrest is permitted at any time, except as specifically prohibited or restricted. Scheduled use is normally restricted to the hours of 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily (midnight on Friday and Saturday nights).

iii. Amplification Policy. Depending upon the time of the day and the day of the week in which the Pentacrest is reserved, an eligible group may be restricted from using electronic sound amplification equipment. Sound amplification that is likely to disrupt the University’s primary use of adjacent buildings is prohibited during normal working and class hours except between 12:20 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. and after 4:20 p.m. until 10pm Monday-Friday; sound amplification may be allowed between 8:00 a.m. and 10:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

iv. Classes. This policy does not affect the practice of conducting outdoor classes on the Pentacrest.

v. Use of Old Capitol stairs. Use of the stairs/steps of the Old Capitol as a stage is prohibited.

vi. Food, Beverage, Sale of Goods, Solicitation. The University Events Committee imposes reasonable viewpoint-neutral restrictions on the provision of food and beverages as well as the sale of goods and solicitation on the Pentacrest.

c. T. Anne Cleary Walkway

i. Located between Jefferson Street and E. Bloomington Street, from Calvin/Gilmore Hall area to Burge/Catlett Hall, north and south of Market St. Food truck approved site with permission.

ii. The walkway itself is not reservable; Kautz Plaza, the raised area on the west side of the T. Anne Cleary Walkway (between Calvin and Trowbridge Halls) may be reserved by members of the campus community.

d. Kautz Plaza

i. Elevated concrete area north of Jefferson Street and south of Market Street bounded by Calvin Hall to the South, Iowa Memorial Union Parking Ramp to the west, Trowbridge Hall to the north, with T. Anne Cleary Walkway (formerly North Capitol Street), Pappajohn Business Administration Building, and Gilmore Hall to the east. The T. Anne Cleary Walkway is not deemed a part of the plaza, for purposes of this policy.

ii. Sale of Goods/Solicitation. Sale of goods or solicitations involving money on Kautz Plaza will only be approved for registered student organizations.

iii. Any food or beverage sold or distributed on Kautz Plaza must be provided by a licensed food vendor/store/restaurant. Request for sales must be disclosed in the application for outdoor space and approved through the UEC.

iv. Number of Events/Tables. More than one event at a time may be scheduled on Kautz Plaza. The number of tables or events permitted simultaneously will be the decision of IMU Event Services. Tables may not be placed in the walkway area between the general curb lines and may not obstruct or impede traffic or university processes.

v. Amplification Policy. Depending upon the time of the day and the day of the week in which the plaza is reserved, an eligible group may be restricted from using electronic sound amplification equipment. Sound amplification that is likely to disrupt the University’s primary use of adjacent buildings is prohibited during normal working and class hours except between 12:20 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. and after 4:20 p.m. daily until 10pm Monday-Friday; sound amplification may be allowed between 8:00 a.m. and 10:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

e. Gibson Square

i. Located at 253 S. Madison Street; located between the CRWC and the Main Library, and East of the Stanley Museum of Art.

ii. Sale of Goods/Solicitation. Sale of goods or solicitations involving money on Gibson Square will only be approved for registered student organizations. Request for sales must be disclosed in the application for outdoor space and approved through the University Events Committee.

iii. Any food or beverage sold or distributed on Gibson Square must be provided by a licensed food vendor/store/restaurant.

iv. Number of Events/Tables. More than one event at a time may be scheduled on the park. The number of tables or events permitted simultaneously will be the decision of IMU Event Services. Tables may not be placed on the walkways and may not obstruct or impede traffic or university processes.

v. Amplification Policy. Depending upon the time of the day and the day of the week in which the square is reserved, an eligible group may be restricted from using electronic sound amplification equipment. Sound amplification that is likely to disrupt the University’s primary use of adjacent buildings is prohibited during normal working and class hours.

f. North Library Plaza

i. This hard-surfaced plaza is located between the north side of Main Library, Adler Journalism and Becker Communications Studies Building, off Washington and Madison Streets; it is bounded to the West by the CRANDIC bridge.

ii. The fire lane, immediately North of the Main Library (and a visual extension of West Washington Street), must be maintained at all times.

iii. Sale of Goods/Solicitation. Sale of goods or solicitations involving money on North Library Plaza will only be approved for registered student organizations. Request for sales must be disclosed in the application for outdoor space and approved through the University Events Committee.

iv. Any food or beverage sold or distributed on North Library Plaza must be provided by a licensed food vendor/store/restaurant.

v. North Library Plaza allows for structures and equipment, such as tents, tables, huts, kiosks, booths, vehicles (including approved food trucks) or similar structures, to be used as approved by the University Events Committee based on dimensions and space, and in connection with an authorized group event or activity. No sign, banner, slogan, symbol, display, or other similar device shall be painted, affixed, erected, or installed on North Library Plaza. Signs, banners, slogans, symbols, and displays may be used on approved tables with approval by the UEC. This prohibition does not apply to the distribution of leaflets to individuals nor to the carrying of picket signs or placards by individuals.

vi. Sale of Goods/Solicitation. All policies governing the sale of goods at the IMU, Hubbard Park, and solicitation by student organizations are applicable to events and activities on North Library Plaza as it serves as a rain backup location for sale of goods/solicitation if turf conditions do not allow an event to occur within Hubbard Park.

vii. Amplification Policy. Depending upon the time of the day and the day of the week in which the plaza is reserved, an eligible group may be restricted from using electronic sound amplification equipment. Sound amplification that is likely to disrupt the University’s primary use of adjacent buildings is prohibited during normal working and class hours.

viii. Number of Events/Tables. More than one event at a time may be scheduled on the park. The number of tables or events permitted simultaneously will be the decision of IMU Event Services. Tables may not be placed on the walkways and may not obstruct or impede traffic or university processes.

F. Appeal processes

1. University Event Committee decisions may be appealed to the Associate Dean of Students and Executive Director of the Iowa Memorial Union by filing a written notice of appeal through this form within ten (10) University business days following the receipt of the decision.

2. Grounds for appeal. Appeals may be submitted by addressing one or more of the following grounds.

a. The decision was unsupported by current University policies and procedures pertaining to outdoor space reservations.

b. The decision denies Constitutionally protected rights of freedom of speech and/or assembly.

3. Decision on Appeal. On appeal, the decision may be denied or granted by the Associate Dean of Students and Executive Director of the Iowa Memorial Union. The Associate Dean of Students and Executive Director of the Iowa Memorial Union will respond in writing (or by email) to the appealing parties within ten (10) business days. The notice of appeal and response will be kept on file in the Office of the Dean of Students. The decision constitutes the final institutional action on the matter.

 

Updated – 3/31/2021

 

 


Policies for Visiting Political Candidates & Elected Officials

As outlined in V-28.3 of the University of Iowa Operations Manual, political candidates and elected officials are welcome on the University of Iowa campus.

Candidate and campaign activities, political events, and rallies (hereafter “events”) in person/or virtual that occur on the University of Iowa campus, including the Health Sciences campus and University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics (UIHC), must be sponsored by a University of Iowa registered student organization. 

UI Departments and units are not allowed to sponsor political candidates or elected officials.

Members of the UI faculty can learn more about political activities in the classroom by visiting: https://provost.uiowa.edu/guidelines-regarding-political-activity-faculty-university-iowa.  

To begin the sponsorship process of political candidates or elected officials, contact or visit Iowa Memorial Union (IMU) Event Services, Room 159 IMU, at 319/335-3114 or the Office of the Dean of Students, Room 135 IMU, at 319/335-1162. The Office of Governmental Relations (319/335-0553) is also available to answer questions.

Information on registered student organizations, including contact names and phone numbers, is available from the Office of the Dean of Students, or by accessing the registered student organization database: https://uiowa.campuslabs.com/engage/organizations.

Through the sponsorship of a registered student organization, political candidates or elected officials may rent space in the IMU and in designated areas in other campus buildings.

All requests must begin with IMU Event Services, Room 159 IMU (319/335-3114). Rental fees and other costs, including event security and parking, must be paid in advance (see Costs section below). Details about specific costs are available from IMU Event Services at 319/335-3114 or https://imu.uiowa.edu/event-services/fees/ and https://imu.uiowa.edu/event-services/spaces/.

Venue doors will not open and the space will not be made available to the public until rental fees and associated costs have been paid in full to IMU Event Services.  

Different fee structures are applied to spaces rented through Recreational Services and Intercollegiate Athletics. Designated locations (see below) may not be available on a specific date or time dependent on University scheduled activities (e.g., academic course schedule, athletic events, other University programs) and all locations must be approved by University Administration and Public Safety. Intercollegiate Athletic venues (except Carver Hawkeye Arena), academic classrooms and auditoria, and the Old Capitol Museum are not designated campus locations for political candidates or elected officials. 

The following are designated locations (if available and approved by University Administration and Public Safety):

  • Carver Hawkeye Arena
  • Field House: Main Deck & South Gym
  • Kautz Plaza & Pentacrest
  • Iowa Memorial Union: Main Lounge, Second Floor Ballroom, Black Box Theater, Meeting Rooms, Hubbard Park, & River Amphitheatre

Each location mentioned above, along with other locations on campus, have an established maximum occupancy load, which is the maximum number of people who can attend the event. This number is based on the size of the space and room configuration. Placement of equipment and items supporting the event (e.g., staging, press risers, security barriers), along with the available exits from the location may impact the total number of people allowed to attend.

It is the duty of the UI Fire Safety Coordinator to establish a safe occupant load and to enforce the pre-determined occupant load during the activity or rally. The UI Fire Safety Coordinator has the ultimate authority and final decision on the number of people allowed to attend any event. Each event is evaluated on a case-by-case basis with regard to potential risks to personal safety, University property or facility security; to promote safety; and to protect the rights of all members of the campus community. 

UI Public Safety, in consultation with the Office of the Dean of Students and IMU Event Services reserves the right to relocate an event to a particular location or deny the event in its entirety. This right is reserved if there are anticipated security challenges and/or safety concerns. The safety of the campus community is the utmost priority for all events.

Events sponsored by a UI registered student organization that feature a political candidate or elected official may require the Critical Incident Management Plan regarding Civil Protest to be activated.

Those policies may be found in this document as policies related to spontaneous, non-sponsored protest and at: https://uiowa.edu/critical-incident-plan/civil-protest. The university will provide a designated protest area for those with opposing viewpoints to protest during events that feature a political candidate or elected official. This designated protest area will be monitored by UI Administration, UI Demonstration Support Team, and UI Public Safety and will be advertised as a protest location to the public. 

Registered student organizations may sponsor a political candidate or elected official event on the UI Pentacrest or Kautz Plaza. These requests must be submitted to Event Services, Iowa Memorial Union, Room 159 IMU (319/335-3114) and follow all UI outdoor space policies.

All events are subject to regulations, including restrictions on time, place, and the use of amplified sound. A student member of the sponsoring registered student organization must make the reservation. Events are prohibited on the steps of the Old Capitol building. 

It is the responsibility of the Associate Dean of Students and Executive Director of the IMU or Associate Director of the IMU to alert UI officials and departments of political candidates or elected officials events sponsored by registered student organizations. Depending on circumstances, other departments or officials may be required to assist in the planning of sponsored events featuring political candidates or elected officials. The following departments will be notified and involvement may be required from:

  • Office of the President
  • Office of the Provost
  • Office of the Vice President for Student Life
  • Office of the Dean of Students
  • Office of Leadership & Engagement
  • Division of Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion
  • Iowa Memorial Union
  • Facilities Management
  • Recreational Services (if a Recreational Services facility is utilized)
  • Department of Intercollegiate Athletics Facilities Director (if an Intercollegiate Athletics Facility is used)
  • Office of Strategic Communication
  • Departments of UI Public Safety, UI Emergency Management, UI Fire Safety, & Johnson County Ambulance Service
  • University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics Emergency Management Coordinator
  • Department of Parking and Transportation
  • Shared Governance Organizations (Undergraduate Student Government, Graduate & Professional Student Government, Faculty Senate, and UI Staff Council)
  • University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics
  • University Housing & Dining
  • University Human Resources
  • University Libraries
  • University Museums

Pre-meetings with all parties and event organizers are required. UI Public Safety must be notified immediately if executive protection detail (not United States Secret Service) will be armed. Contact information for those individuals must be provided from political candidates or elected officials. 

All press and media will be required to work with UI Strategic Communication. Event organizers and sponsors must inform UI Administration if press and media will be in attendance. 

The selling of merchandise by external campaign vendors is not permitted on the UI campus. Individuals may be allowed to sell merchandise on City of Iowa City property but would be required to follow all City of Iowa City ordinances and permitting requirements.

University Housing and Dining offers politicians and political organizations access to residence hall students on a limited basis. Please consult University Housing & Dining related to their specific policies.

Costs

The sponsored political candidate or elected official must pay all costs associated with University services and event and venue security. UI Public Safety will determine all security costs and security requirements. All event costs related to venue space and identified University services must be paid at the time of reservation, before the scheduled event will occur. The sponsoring registered student organization will receive one invoice, prepared by IMU Event Services, that is inclusive of all University-associated costs. Costs will be estimates, and the political candidate or elected official will be responsible for any additional costs incurred. Public rates will apply to all political candidate or elected official events sponsored by a registered student organization. Venue doors will not open and the space will not be made available to the public until rental fees and associated costs have been paid in full to IMU Event Services. 

The University will provide event security to State of Iowa elected officials, which includes the six (6) elected officials of Iowa’s Congressional delegation, if the event is associated with official office duties and not campaign related. If the event is related to any election campaign, the elected official is required to pay all costs associated with event security.

Individual faculty members may allow political candidates, elected officials, or campaign staff to address their courses about relevant issues, but not for the purpose of political campaigning. Participation is open only to those students enrolled in the course.  More information can be found here: https://provost.uiowa.edu/guidelines-regarding-political-activity-faculty-university-iowa.

No blanket invitations may be extended by a political candidate or elected official to the general public prior to coordination with the sponsoring registered student organization. No more than 25% of the total seating may be reserved for invited guests. Students must have first priority for general seating.

The aforementioned UI policies for visiting political candidates and elected officials are predicated on these events being an educational opportunity for students.

It is imperative the registered student organization maintain an active role in planning and executing the event. It is an expectation the sponsoring registered student organization have a dedicated time to meet with the political candidate or elected official before or after the event. 

Definitions:

Political Candidate: Any person seeking or being considered for an elected office at the local, state, or federal level.

Elected Official: Any person who holds elected office at the local, state, or federal level. 

Campaign staff member: Any person who is employed by, or volunteers for, or any person who serves as a surrogate for a political candidate or elected official (as defined above).

Updated - 3/22/2021